Kodiak Bear

Alaska Native Craft

Aleut Alutiiq ceremonial hunting hats

Alaska Naive Art and Craft



Alaska Native Craft created by Peter Lind, Sr. an Alaskan Native


Artist, Peter Lind, Sr., creates traditional styled Alutiiq / Aleut ceremonial hunting hats. The ceremonial hunting hats have a bentwood visor with painted geometric designs and decorated with ivory, baleen, feathers and Russian trade beads. The decorations honored the spirits and transformed the wearer into a mighty hunter, capable of braving the ocean and its dangers. The ceremonial hunting hat, also hid his human identity from his prey. The hunting hat gave more visibility, protected the eyes from ocean glare and seawater spray and it even improved his hearing.

Artist, Peter Lind, Sr., was born in Chignik, Alaska in 1930 and is of Russian - Aleut descent. He enjoys today his own proud identity in researching and construct his art in Aleut tradition..

The headgear served in a functional way, protecting against sea spray, sun glare and channeled sound to the ears. The visors also held great symbolism and ritual. Our ancestors considered the headdress a mask that held their human shape hidden from their prey, the sea mammals.

There are three styles of bentwood visors seen on this page:

1. The closed crown bentwood visor, which is, the highest ranking - worn by Chiefs and the high-ranking hunters and warriors.

2. Very skilled hunters wore the longer, open crown visors.

3. Shorter crown visors and with lesser decoration, worn by younger men and less skill in hunting.

All the items listed on this page are for sale by Peter Lind, Sr. Mr. Lind can be reached at 4215 West Overby St, Wasilla, Alaska 99623. Telephone (907) 376-0746.


Select the thumbnail of the picture you wish to view from the list below:

Hunting Hats(59kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

The bentwood visors shown are made in the Aleut / Alutiiq tradition. The visors were used in the hunting of sea mammals, such as, sea otter, whales, walrus and seals.

High Chief - highly skilled hunter(64kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

The highest ranking closed crown bentwood visor worn only by Chiefs and the high-ranking hunters and warriors. The decoration of the visor was also talismans protective charms to keep them safe on the open sea. The type of bentwood visor also indicated status or rank.
Mr. Lind sells this item for $6,000.00

very skilled hunter(58kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

Very skilled hunters wore the longer, open crown visors. Mr. Lind sells this item for $4,000.00.

skilled hunter(47kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

Very skilled hunters wore the longer, open crown visors. Mr. Lind sells this item for $4,000.00.

unskilled hunter(52kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

Shorter crown visors and with lesser decoration, worn by younger men and less skill in hunting. Mr. Lind sells this item for $4,000.00.



Aleut / Alutiiq Throwing Dart

The Aleut throwing dart (also known as the atl-atl) was used in hunting small marine mammals, such as, seals and sea otters from a qayaq*(Alutiiq for kayak). The end of the dart shaft was placed in a grove on a small board held in the hunters' hand. The hunter placed his index finger through a hole in the board, which helped to hold the shaft in place. The board helped in increasing both the striking force and range of the dart. As the dart was thrown, the board was retained in the hunters' hand.

dart(64kb jpg)
Photo credit Chris Russ - Homer, Alaska.

Upon striking the seal or sea otter the spear point would enter the animal and disengage from the shaft. A sinew line (tied in the middle of the shaft) would then unravel and turn the shaft sideways in the water, thus slowing down the animals effort to escape. The rock or club tied to the hunter's baidarka was used as the final weapon. Mr. Lind sells this item for $750.00.

Skin qayak - kayak(98kb jpg)
Photo Bill Jager

Qayak* (kayak) being demonstrated at the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage.



NOTE: All orders to Mr. Lind require half of the payment down and there is some waiting period.



*qayak: [kayak] a small skin-covered (called a baidarka by the Russians): Anyaq (Alutiiq) a large skin boat used to transport heavy cargoes were called a baidara by the Russians. The Anyaq was also used to transport a mass of people and goods. This mass transportation usually took place when a village shifted its habitation from a summer village to a winter village and visa versa. Long distant hunting trips were a common place. It was known that a hunter could paddle up to eighteen hours and get speed up to eight miles an hour. More information on the Alutiiq qayak can be found at Alutiiq Museum.

More on Alaskan Art-work at: Bits of Alaska Offering Elegant Handcrafted Alaskan Jewelry and Artwork by Peter A. Lind and Susan L. Lind of Homer, Alaska.

Background image Ceremonial Hunting Hat

Genuine Aleut/Alutiiq ceremonial hunting hat made by an Alaska Native, Peter Lind, Sr. The ceremonial hunting hat was worn during elaborate rituals and when hunting whale or sea otter. The ceremonial hunting hat was colorfully decorated with ivory sculptures, sea lion whiskers, colorful bird feathers and was worn by important men. A similar, simple wooden hat was worn when men hunted, but it had an open crown and short visor. If anyone would like more information on the ceremonial hats, contact Peter Lind at 4215 West Overby St, Wasilla, Alaska 99623. Telephone (907) 376-0746.


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Bill Jager

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