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William Cody Family of Old Rowan (Surry) County, North Carolina, and Montgomery, Russell and Scott Counties, Virginia


Surry County, North Carolina


The Cody's moved from Lunenburg County, Virginia (now Franklin County), to Rowan County by about 1755 when Thomas Cody, a son of Pierce Cody, was a buyer at the estate sale of Thomas Ridge, formerly of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, father of William Ridge, Tory, of Surry County. William Cody first appears in records in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1762 as buyers in the estate sale of Benjamin Boucher, formerly of Orange County, Virginia. The administrator of Benjamin's estate was William Ridge, Tory, later of Surry County. Also mentioned was a John Cody (1):

1762 (Rowan Co.) Estate sale of Benjamin Boucher. Buyers at sale: William Ridge, Owen Griffen, William Morris, William Draper, Ben Grifen, Wm. Roye, John Codey, Wm Brucksher, George Roy, Wm Megee, Robert Anderson, Wm Robason, John Blalock, Henry Thomson, Wm Codey.

William Cody was on Capt. Gideon Wright's tax list in c1768 in Rowan County (2) in the area of present day Surry County. William was not found on earlier tithe lists of Lunenburg County (1746-1752) or Rowan County (1759) with Pierce, Godfrey and Thomas Cody. In both Virginia and North Carolina, all white males age 16 and over were taxed, and those 21 years of age or older were typically designated as head of household. William was likely born 1743-1747, and probably one of Pierce's younger sons, although William could also have been a grandson, son of Thomas (born before 1727).

Several persons listed by on Gideon Wright's tax list are important for tracing the movements of William Cody, such as brother Godfrey Cody (born 1736-1738), and the Combs and Stacys, who were related by marriage (3): 

Rowan County Tax List of  Gideon Wright, 1768 (estimate)

Benjamin Stacy, 1 tithe

Mason Combs, 2 tithes

Wm Combs, 1 tithes

Godfry Cody, 1 tithe

Wm Codey, 1 tithe

Wm Ridge, 4 tithes

Nathaniel All[en] 2 tithes

 

 

William Cody most likely married Sinai Stacy, daughter of Simon and Judith Tolson Stacy. Simon and Judith Tolson Stacy were  from Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia. Mason Combs (c1714-1785) and wife Sarah were also from Overwharton Parish and the Combs and Stacy families not only migrated together from Stafford County to Frederick County, Virginia by 1750, and to Rowan (Surry) County, North Carolina by 1768, but  they knew each other in Stafford and Frederick Counties,Virginia, and their descendants intermarried.
 

Children of Mason and 
Sarah Combs
of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., VA

Children of Simon Stacy and
Judith Tolson 
married 
22 August 1741
Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., VA

Child

Birth

Spouse

Child

Birth

Spouse

John Combs

1734-1740

Nancy Harding

 

 

 

William Combs

November 28, 1740
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

Sithe Stacy

Sithe Stacy

June 30, 1746
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

William Combs (Tory)

Ann Combs

March 18, 1742/43
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

Benjamin Stacy

Benjamin Stacy

April 07, 1744
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

Ann Combs

Sarah Combs

February 25, 1744/45
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

no further information

Sinai Stacy

March 01, 1750/51
Overwharton Parish
Stafford Co., VA

William Cody (Tory & Patriot)

Mason Combs

February 21, 1746/47
Overwharton Parish,
Stafford Co., VA

Dorothy

Simon Stacy

1762, Frederick Co., VA

Elizabeth Davidson of Russell Co., VA

Winneford Combs

May 14, 1749
Overwharton Parish,
Stafford Co., VA

1-William Ridge
2-Nathan Allen

Sarah Stacy

August 20, 1741
Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., VA

Abner Everage (probable) of Sullivan Co., TN

Wilmot Combs

October 05, 1751
Overwharton Parish,
Stafford Co., VA

no further information

Mary Stacy

February 19, 1749
Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., VA

 

 

 

 

John Stacy (Tory)

probably after 1750 in Frederick Co., VA

 

Winnefred Combs was the wife of William Ridge, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Ridge of Old Rowan County (now Randolph and Davidson Counties), North Carolina. Winnefred Combs was involved in lengthy lawsuits to settle William's estate after he was killed in the Tory militia at the Revolutionary War Battle of Hanging Rock in August 1780. These lawsuits provide additional information on the Codys which will be discussed below.

William Cody was married to Sinai Stacy probably before 1768 when he was recorded as head of household. William's older brother, Thomas Cody, moved from the lower Yadkin River Valley, Old Rowan County, now Randoph and Davidson Counties, by 1772 (4).

1771 Surry County Tax List
William Code 1 WP [ m. Sinai Stacy]
Godfrey Code 1 WP
Thomas Pettit 3 WP [m2. Judith Tolson Stacy]
William Ridge 5 WP [m2. Winnefred Combs]
Mason Comes Sr 3 WP [m. Sarah]
William Comes 1 WP [m. Sythe Stacy]

1772  Surry County Tax List
William Code 1 WP [ m. Sinai Stacy]
Godfrey Code 1 WP
Thomas Coodey [brother of  William Codey]
Benjamin Stace 1 WP [m. Ann Combs]

1774 Surry County Tax List of Benjamin Cleveland
William Comes 1 tithe [m. Sythe Stacy]
William Coda 1 tithe [m. Sinai Stacy]

1777 Surry County Tax List of Capt. Jabez Jarvis
Godfrey Codey

Joseph Winston's land entry book revealed where the Cody's settled and also the appearance of a John Cody, along with William, Thomas and Godfrey. William Cody entered land on Camp Creek, waters of Mitchell River near Wilkes County and near Benjamin Stacy, William Combs, William Ridge, John Fielder, and William T. Lewis Jr. (5).

1778-1781 Land Entry (no date) John Fielder, 250 acres on Camp Creek on the west side of Cody's improvement. [This John Fielder could either be Capt. John Fielder, Jr, married Nancy Ridge, daughter of William Ridge, Tory, or John Fielder Sr, married Elizabeth Lewis.]

1778-1781 Land Entry (no date) Joseph Pruit, 150 acres on Camp Creek, the waters of Mitchell's River, adjoining John Fielder's entry including William Cody's improvement; Warrant issued to H. Speer Dec 17, 1803, transferred.

1778 September 14 Land entry. Micajah Lewis enters for Joel Lewis in the service of the United States, 150 acres on Camp Creek including William Codey's plantation for complement. Caveated by William Combs, returned to court.

1778 September 17 William T. Lewis enters 250 acres of land lying on the north side of the Yadkin River and bounded by Mace [Mason] Combs [Sr] & Henry Hand including William Rig's [Ridge's] Plantation for compliment.

1779 January 27 Land entry. James Fielder, 100 acres on Mitchell's River, south fork, including Benjamin Stacy's improvement; withdrawn. Also land on Camp Creek of Middle Fork, Mitchell River and land on North Fork, Mitchell River; withdrawn. [James Fielder was a brother of John Fielder, Jr. James married Sally Benge.]

1779 December 10 Land entry. John Stasey, 100 acres on the north fork of Mitchell River; warrant granted

1780 January 29 William Combs, Sr enters 300 acres of land in Surry County on both sides of Mitchell's River beginning below the mouth of Camp Creek including said William Combs improvement; warrant granted

1780 February 17 William T. Lewis enters 200 acres on the north side of the Yadkin River joining my entry that includes William Ridge's [Ridge's] improvement including Benjamin Smith's improvement; warrant issued.

No date. Land entry. John Combs enters 200 acres on Ridge's Creek adjoining William T. Lewis' survey including Benjamin Smith's improvement.

No date. Land entry. Francis Calloway, enters 400 acres of land in Surry County on both sides, south fork of Mitchell River including improvements he purchased of Benjamin Stasey; warrant issued

John Fielder was the son-in-law of William Ridge (d. 1780), and John and Nancy Ridge Fielder, along with brother James Fielder and wife Sally Benge, moved to Wilkes County, Georgia. Micajah and Joel Lewis were brothers to William Terrell Lewis, Jr., all patriot military officers from Surry and Wilkes Co., NC. William T. Lewis Jr was a prominant defendant in the suit of William Ridge's (d. 1780) orphans in Surry County. William Cody's step-father, Thomas Pettit, and Winnefred Combs Ridge were neighbors of William and Sinai Cody, and lived on Mitchell River in 1782 (6):

1782 Surry County Tax List of Capt. Sheppard
Thomas Pettit, Sr 2 tithe, 7 slaves, 100 acres, Mitchell River
Thomas Pettit, Jr, 4 tithes, 6 slaves
Sarah Stacey, 0 tithes, 4 slaves  [?]
James Fielder, 3 tithes, 5 slaves, 450 acres, Mitchell River
John Fielder, 5 tithes, 8 slaves, 100 acres, Mitchell River

1782 Surry County Tax List of Capt. Martin
John Fielder 3 tithes, 9 slaves, 350 acres, Camp Creek
William T. Lewis 7 tithes, 14 slaves, 150 acres, Camp Creek (and other lands)
John Combs 3 tithes, 14 slaves, 400 acres, north side Yadkin River
Winney Ridge 1 tithe, 4 slaves

The following deed, whereby William Terrell Lewis sold the estate of Micajah Lewis to Nathan Allen, second husband of Winnefred Combs Ridge, showed that Thomas Pettit's land was adjacent to Camp Creek on Mitchell River (7):

1785 August 6 William T. Lewis, heir-at-law of Micajah Lewis, deceased, and Nathan Allin, for 100, 400 acres on both sides of Mitchells River crossing Camp Creek... adjoining the agreed line of Micajah Lewis and Thomas Pettit; witnesses: J[ames] M[artin] Lewis, Elizabeth Ware

In the lawsuit (8) filed by the guardians and orphans of William Ridge, several deponants accused William Cody, Godfrey Cody, Thomas Cody, John Stacy, Mason Combs, Nicholas Combs, and Jeremiah and Biram Combs (sons of Danger Nick) of being Tories during the Revolution. Surry and Wilkes Counties contained a substantial number of Tories who were organized into militias and fought against the Patriot (Whig) militias and the Continental Line. In Surry County, this was a civil war which divided families. The court records clearly stated that William Ridge died in the Tory militia at Hanging Rock, SC in 1780.  And Thomas Cody was accused of being a Captain in the Tory militia. William Terrell Lewis Jr, defendant, deposed witnesses for the defense, and he sought to impeach the testimony of  the Codys, Stacys and Combs. Not too surprising, no deponant had complements for the Cody, Combs and Stacys. Below are quotations from several depositions.

Question 2'd. do you know any thing of the carrector of John Combs William Combs Mason Combs Biram Combs Jeremiah Combs Thomas Cody Godfrey Cody William Cody or John Stacy or any of them.

Captain Salathiel Martin 1806 Claiborne County, Tennessee:

Answer. I beleave that thay were all relations of William Ridge by marrige and also was counted disafected to the amarican cause- that the most of them took an active part with the British and som of them murdered a sertin Francis Bradly in Mecklenburg County No Carolina that is Godfry Ridge Biram Combs and Jeremiah Combs as thay returned home from the british camps.

David Allen 1802 Davidson County, Tennessee:

"Question 2d. Do you know any thing of the characters of John Combs, William Combs, Mason Combs, Biram Combs, Jeremiah Combs, Thomas Coody, Godfrey Coody, William Coody and John Stacy- if you do please to relate what you know respecting them.

"Answer. I believe them to be all related to William Ridge, I also believe that the most of them were disaffected toward the American cause and that the most of them took an active part against the Americans in favour of the british and that some of them were murderers and were generally called men of infamous character and in short no truth could be placed in any thing they might sa[y] or do.
 

John P. McConnell 1804 Davidson County, Tennessee:

"Quest 2d. Do you know anything of the characters of John Combs, William Combs, Biram Combs, Jeremiah Combs, Thomas Cody, Godfrey Cody, John Stacy or any of them.

"Ansr. I believe they were all relations of William Ridge. I do also believe them all to be disaffected to the American cause that the most of them took an active part with the British & some of them murdered a son of Mr. BRADLEY in Mecklenburg County North Carolina and the rest of them were infamous villains.
 

John Fielder, Senior, 1804 Davidson County, Tennessee:

"Question Asked the Deponant in behalf of the Defendants do you know any thing of the carrictors of Thos. Coody Wm Coody Godfre Coody John Combs Wm Combs Mason Combs or the carricture of the Coodys and Combs in genl if you do relate it.

"Answered they all were calld enemys to the Country and that this Deponant understood that Thomas Coody commanded a Tory Company, that Wm Combs and others was apprehended for killing a stear said to be the property of Joseph Thompson and that Wm Coody in the presence of this Deponant robed the corn house of Wm T. Lewis of a bag of corn. This deponant further saith that he has ever understood that two of the Combs viz. Torrys with others on there way from the Battle of Hanging rock murdered a gentleman in Macklinburg County.

James Doherty, 1802 Robertson County, Tennessee:

.. & saith that Francis Bradly was murdered in Mecklenburgh County North Carolina, that he saw him after he was killed. That it was said he was murdered by some Tories on their retreat from the Battle of the Hanging Rock, that they took from him a rifle gun made by Isaac Price, also a pair of sleve buttons as this deponant was afterwards informed, the gun & buttons was taken from the murderers.

Peter Spence 1802, Davidson County, Tennessee:

Are you acquainted with the characters of John Combs- William Combs- Mason Combs- Thomas Coody- Godfrey Coody- William Coody and John Stacey if you are relate what you know of them and their characters generally.

Answer. They were, I believe, all relatives of the aforesaid William Ridge- were generally considered infamous and abandoned characters amongst them acquainted with them- for they were all said to be tories and some of them were charged with the murder of a certain Mr. Bradley in Maclenburg County in the State of North Carolina in the year 1780 on their return from the battle of the hanging rock in the State of South Carolina, the discovery of which murder was made in this neighborhood, by the sleve buttons & gun of the murdered man being found in the possession of some of them and the rest of them indeed the whole was generally charged with stealing of Horses, Cattle and Hogs and in short they were generally considered as being capable of doing every thing infamous and dishonest.

John Combs Sr and his brothers, Mason Combs (Jr), William Combs, and also Godfrey Cody and Thomas Cody received public claims indents for services rendered to the Whig militia or the Continental Line, suggesting that they changed allegiance or were falsely accused. No such public claim records survived for William Cody, although he did join a Col. Daniel Trigg's Whig militia unit in 1781 in Montogomery County, Virginia. Francis Bradley, Sheriff of Mecklenburg County, was indeed murdered by Tories in late 1780, and Isaac Price, a gun and goldsmith, administered the probate of  Bradley's estate (9). And Surry County Tory militia units of Captain Roger Turner and Captain Richard Murphy, under Colonel Samuel Bryan, fought at Hanging Rock  No pay records or muster rolls have been found to corroborate the claim that Thomas Cody was a Captain in the Tory militia, or that William, Godfrey or Thomas Cody served in a Tory unit.

The 1778 land entries were the last record found in Surry County for William Cody. He is next found in Montgomery County, Virginia, along with Benjamin Stacy and William Combs.

Judith Tolson Stacy, mother-in-law of William Cody, lived in Surry County, but had remarried to Thomas Pettit, Sr. of Surry County, North Carolina, after the death in 1762 of Simon Stacy. Thomas Pettit died before 1784 and left a will in Surry County (10).

1784 July 12. Last Will & Testament of Thomas Pettit, Sr; wife Judith, son Thomas, wife's son Simon Stacy, daughter Mary Ransom. Executors Judith Pettit and Thomas Pettit. Witnessed by John Burch, William Cook; proved by William Cook, recorded February Court 1786


Montgomery County, Virginia


By 1781, William Cody had moved to Montgomery County, Virginia, immediately north of Surry and Wilkes Counties. Exactly where they settled is unknown, but probably in the area of present day Wythe, Carroll or eastern Grayson County, close to North Carolina. William Combs and wife Sythe Stacy, and Benjamin Stacy and wife Ann Combs, Mason Combs Jr and wife Dorothy, also migrated to Montogomery County.

Many occupants of the New River Valley were staunchly loyal to Britain and it would appear reasonable that William Cody fled, given the danger of being captured and hung by Colonel Benjamin Cleveland of Surry and Wilkes Counties, North Carolina. Indeed, Cleveland "half-hung" a William Combs, Tory, of Surry County (11), possibly the husband of Sythe Stacy, but let him off after declaring allegiance to the Whigs. However, William Cody and William Combs had joined Captain Daniel Triggs patriot militia in Montgomery County (12):

1781 March 31, Daniel Triggs Militia List, 50 for duty
Wm. Coadey [m. Sinai Stacy]
Benjamin Staycie [m. Ann Combs]
John Staycie
Simon Staycie [m. Elizabeth Davidson]
Wm Combs [m. Sythe Stacy]
Mayson Combs [m. Dorothy]

The Sumner family also resided in Montomery County. Samuel Sumner and wife Nancy Winneford Combs, daughter of William Combs and Sythe Stacy, were the parents of Elizabeth Sumner (born 1783-1785) who married John Cody/Coday, a son of William and Sinai Stacy Cody. John and Elizabeth Sumner Coday and their descendants, along with Stacy decendants, moved to Wright County, Missouri, where many persons of these surnames reside today. Other children of  Samuel and Nancy Combs Sumner were John who married Judith Stewart, Syntha Nancy who married Jeremiah C. Combs, and Mary Sumner who married George Stacy. The Combs and Sumners were listed in the 1782 Montgomery tax list, although William Cody was missing (13).

1782 Tithe List
Mason Combs 1 tithe, 2 horses, 5 cattle [Mason Jr, m. Dorothy]
William Combs 1 tithe, 2 horses  [William m. Sythe Stacy]
James Sumner 1 tithe
Matthew Sumner 1 tithe
Samuel Sumner 1 tithe, 1 horse, 1 cattle [m. Nancy Winneford Combs]
Benjamin Stacy 1 tithe, 1 horse
John Stacy 1 tithe

In 1785 Nancy Cody, daughter of William and Sinai, married David Thompson, son of Archibald Thompson and Mary Elswick, in Montgomery County. The marriage bond named William Cody as father and as bondsman (14). David Thompson and William Cody were residents in 1787 (15):

1787 June 28 Montgomery County Tax List A
Samuel Sumner

1787 June 29 Montgomery County Tax List B
John Combs, 2 tithes- self & 1 male over 21, 2 horses, 5 cows [son of Mason and Sarah of Surry Co., NC]

1787 April 21 Montgomery County Tax List C
William Coady, self [m. Sinai Stacy]
David Thompson [m. Nancy Cody]

William Cody left Montgomery County  in 1787 or 1788 without paying taxes (16):

1788 Montgomery County Tax List, Bird Smith, Commr.
"Those who removed from the county before tax could be levied for 1787"
William Coddy

1788 Montgomery County Tax List, James Newll, Commr
"Those who removed from the county before tax could be levied for 1787"
Samuel Sumner kild, and his wife gone to Wash[ington Co., VA]

Samuel Sumner died in 1787, possibly at the hands of the Sheriff. Samuel's widow remarried to Rev. Robert Hicks, and they removed to Washington County, Virginia in the area of present day Russell County. By 1807 they had moved to Clay County (later Perry County), Kentucky.

Several Combs families remained in Montogomery County, in what is now Wythe County and Pulaski County at the Carroll County line, namely John Combs, son of Mason and Sarah Combs Sr of Surry County, North Carolina, and John's son's, Henry and Mason (16-18). Further information on these families is available at  The COMBS-COOMBS &c. Research Group, Inc.


Russell County, Virginia


One of the earliest settlers to Russell County was Joseph Kiser and wife Susannah Stacy, a first cousin of Sinai Stacy Cody. Joseph and Susannah moved to Glade Hollow on the Clinch River. John Stacy and wife Lucy Skaggs, and Elizabeth Stacy and husband James Davidson, grandchildren of Simon Stacy and Judith Tolson Stacy, lived in Washington County, Virginia in 1785 and petitioned for the division of the county, thus forming Russell County (19). They, too, lived on the Clinch, close to the Kisers.

1785 Petition  House of Delegates To Form Russell County
John Stacy [m. Lucy Skaggs; son of Benjamin and Ann Combs Stacy]
Mashack Stacy
James Davidson [father of Elizabeth, wife of Simon Stacy, brother of Sinai Cody]
Henry Skaggs [father of Lucy]

William and Sythe Stacy Combs removed from Montgomery County to Sullivan County, Tennessee, in the area north of the Holston River that was claimed by Washington County, Virginia, but also claimed as the State of Franklin, and by North Carolina. William and Sythe lived but a few miles from Russell County (19). They left Sullivan County in 1788 and moved to Russell County, Virginia.

1788 July 26 William Combs and Sethe, his wife, of Sullivan County, North Carolina to Phillip Fouse of Sullivan County, 200 acres; witnessed by John Lowry and Seth Porterfield.

William and Sinai Stacy Cody were living in the Upper District of Russell County on the upper branches of the Clinch River in 1789, along with several of the former Montgomery County Combs,  and Simon and Judith Stacys children* and grandchildren** (20):
 

 

Upper District, Russell County, Virginia

Titheable

Spouse

1787

1788

1789

1790

1793

William Coday

Sinai Stacy*

 

 

1

1

 

John Combs

 

 

 

 

1

 

Mason/Mesheck Combs

Dorothy

 

 

1

1

 

William Combs

Sythe Stacy*

 

 

1

2

 

William Combs

Anna Thompson

 

 

1

1

 

Judith Pettit

Simon Stacy, dec'd
Thomas Pettit, dec'd

 

 

 

1

 

Reuben Price

Dolly Cody**

 

1

1

1

 

Benjamin Stacy*

Ann Combs

 

 

1

1

 

John Stacy Sr

 

0,1

1

1

 

 

John Stacy Jr*

Lucy Skaggs

1

1

1

 

 

Meshick Stacy

 

1

 

1

1

 

Peter Stacy

 

 

1

1

1

 

Simon Stacy*

Elizabeth Davidson

1

1

1

1

1

William Stacy

 

 

 

1

 

 

David Thompson

Nancy Cody**

 

 

1

 

 

One of the several William Combs, husband of Anna Thompson, lived on Weaver Creek, a tributary of the Clinch River, near the present Buchanan County and Washington County lines. The location where William Cody and Judith Tolson Stacy Pettit lived in the Upper District is unknown. Meshack and Simon Stacy lived nearby to William Combs, on Cedar Creek, another Clinch River tributary (21).

1791 February 22 Indenture between Francis Price & Jane, his wife and Thomas Hansford, all of Russell County, 150 for 272 acres according to the conditional line made by Meshack Stacy, Simon Stacy & William Jewel lying in Russell formerly Washington County on both sides of the Glade Hollow Branch, the waters of Cedar Creek, a Branch of Clinch River and bounded by a corner of Patrick & John Koils; land which was granted to Cornelius Roberts by patent bearing date 06 March 1787. Signed; Francis Price, Jane Price. Recorded 22 Feb 1791


Lower Russell County, Virginia, Later Scott County, Virginia


Judith Tolson Stacy Pettit, and her family, including William and Sinai Stacy Cody, William and Sythe Stacy Combs, and Peter Stacy do not appear on tax lists from 1791-1795. William and Sinai Stacy Cody were  recorded in Sullivan County, Tennessee, but this region was disputed between Virginia and Tennessee (22).

1794 Feb 27 Knoxville (TN) Gazette. A list of letters remaining at the Abingdon Post Office, per Peter Burhart, P. M.:...William Coda, Sullivan County

Also living within this disputed regions (northwestern Hawkins County, Tennessee) were William Combs and wife Dorothy, and Peter Stacy.

The first relation to move to Moccassin Creek, a tributary of the Holston River, was James Davidson, related through the marriage of his daughter, Elizabeth, to Simon Stacy, who was living thereby 1789 and ran a mill (23).

1793 October 10 Deed Book 1, p 305. Indenture between Champain Faris and John White both of Russell Co., 40 lawful money of the State of Virginia, land in Russell County on Big Moqueson Creek on the north side of the creek containing 50 acres beginning at the mouth of the first branch below James Davidson's Mill House branch, the dug bank, towards Copper Creek Ridge with James Osborns line. Signed: Champain (his X Mark) Faris. Witnesses: John Wood, James Osborn, John (his + mark) Stacey. Recorded 28 Jan 1794 proven on oaths of John Wood & James Osborn.

William and Sinai Stacy Cody first appeared on the 1796 tax list (24) (see below). In 1797 William had a second tithable, who could have been son John Cody.  John Cody was 21 years of age or older and listed separately in 1798-1800 which suggested that he was born c1777. John was no longer found in Russell County after 1800 and was next found in Clay County, Kentucky where he married Elizabeth Sumner in 1809 (daughter of Samuel and Winneford Combs Sumner), and was on the US Census of adjacent Clark County, Kentucky in 1810.
 

 

 

Lower District, Russell County, Virginia

Titheable

Spouse

1796

1797

1798

1799

1800

1802

1810

William Cody 

Sinai Stacy*

1

2

3

3

2

1

0

John Cody 

 

 

 

1

1

1

 

 

Thomas Cody**

Molly Bays

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

Zedekiah Cody**

Tabitha Osbourne

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

John Combs 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

 

William Combs Sr.

Sythe Stacy**

 

 

0

0

 

 

 

William Combs 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

 

Samuel Cornet 

 

1

1

1

1

1

 

 

James Davidson 

 

 

 

1

1

1

 

 

Robert Hicks

Winneford Combs**

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

George Stacy

Mary __

1

1

1

1

1

2
(1BP)

 

John Stacy Sr.

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meshack Stacy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Peter Stacy 

 

 

1

1

1

1

 

 

Simon Stacy*

Elizabeth Davidson

 

 

1

1

1

 

 

John Summers 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

David Thompson 

Nancy Cody**

1

1

1

1

1

 

 

The possibility exists that John Coday, son of William, remained at home and was tithed with William and Sinai Cody until 1800, after which he left for Kentucky. The second John Cody, listed separately in 1798-1800, would have been the brother of William Cody, having removed from Surry County near the close of the American Revolution.

William and Sina's son, Thomas Coday, was born 1783 according to his deposition (see below), and was therefore was one of the 3 titheables in 1798. He was married c1801 listed separately. Thomas moved to Perry County, Kentucky by 1850 where he and son Thomas Cody were enumerated.

William and Sinai Stacy Cody's land was near the mouth of Big Moccasin Creek near Gates City, Virginia. Their son, Thomas Cody described the area in which they lived in Virginia, in his deposition of 1853 from Perry County, Kentucky (25):

Revolutionary War Service Pension Application of William Cornett, Thomas Cody of Perry Co., KY, 25 January 1853. "Thomas Cody declares he was born in 1783 and has been a resident of Kentucky since 1804. His grandmother Judah Stacy raised Mary (Everage Cornett) as a child until she married William Cornett. Mary married about 55 or 56 years ago. William was then a middle aged man and had children. Mary had two children but was never married before she married Cornett. She had Sally and Polly before she married. Sally was the eldest and married Thomas McDaniel and Polly married Robt. S. Brashers, Probate Judge of Perry County. Mary was considered one of his family and was married at the house of George Morrison in Sullivan Co., Tenn. Squire Gaines, a justice of the peace, married them. A short time after they were married Cornet left for the mountains of Kentucky and seven or eight years afterward he [Thomas Cody] left for Kentucky with his father, hunting for elk and buffalo, and found William Cornett and his wife in a camp at the mouth of Bull Creek, a branch of the north fork of the Kentucky River. This was in 1804. Mary and Cornett were marrried but a short distance from where his father lived, as all the family were present, as his grandmother Stacy had helped to raise Mary. William had children Robert, Nancy, Roger, Samuel, Nathaniel, Rachael, Joseph E. and an infant not named. These were the children Mary had by him after their marriage."

Mary Everage, who married William Cornett, the pensioner, was raised by her grandmother, Judith (Judah) Tolson Stacy Pettit. William and Mary were married in Sullivan County, Tennessee "but a short distance from where his [Thomas Cody] father lived" which was in Russell County, a few miles from the present state line. Samuel Cornett was a brother of William Cornett, and his land in Russell County adjoined William and Sinai Stacy Cody, David and Nancy Cody Thompson, William and Sythe Stacy Combs, and James Davidson, father of and Elizabeth Stacy who married Simon Stacy, all on Big Moccasin Creek (26)

1799 May 13 Granted...unto David Thompson a certain tract or parcel of land containing one hundred acres by survey bearing date the eighteen day of November one thousand seven hundred and ninety five lying and being in the County of Russell on big Mockeson Creek and bounded as followeth to wit, Beginning at three Buckeyes in the North west bank of said Creek and in a line of Samuel Cornett...to two white oaks and black oak on the top of a ridge...to two hickories and white oak on the top of a ridge in or near a line of William Turners survey...by a road.

The above patent was granted following survey of  Treasury warrant 1951 that had previously issued 18 December 1781. This same warrant included land patented by William Benham, assignee of James Davidson in 1799 (27):

1799 May 11 Granted...unto William Benham assignee of James Davidson a certain tract or parcel of land containing one hundred one hundred acres by survey bearing date the fifteenth day of November one thousand seven hundred and nintey five lying and being in the County of Russell on big Mockerson Creek a branch of the North fork of Holstein River and bounded as followeth to wit, Beginning at three black oaks and white oak corner to the land of Samuel Cornett...south side of a spur of Clinch Mountain...

William and Sythe Stacy Combs patented land 100 acres on Mocossin Creek in in 1800 (27) and sold it in 1804 (28). The closeness of his land to William Cody and Samuel Cornett was documented in the patent of Benjamin Reed (29):

1807 June 29 Granted...unto Benjamin Reed a certain tract or parcel of land, containing sixty acres by survey bearing date the nineteenth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred & five, lying and being in the county of Russell, on the south side of Mockerson creek and its waters, and bounded as followeth to wit: Beginning at a white oak and beech at the foot of a spur of Clinch mountain on a line of Zebode Lovealls, thence with said Loveall's line...nearly on the top of a bald ridge, corner to said Loveall and Samuel Cornett, thence with said Cornett's line....on the top of a rocky ridge, thence leaving said Cornett's line...on the side of ridge on William Codie's line, thence with said Codie's line...on the bank of a branch corner to William Wells and William Combs, thence with said Combs's line...on the east side of a spur of Clinch mountain corner to said Combs,..

William and Sinai's daughter, Nancy Thompson lived in Russell County through at least 1806 when they sold their 100 acres of patented land (30).

1806 March 4 Deed Book 3, p. 710. Indenture between David Thompson & Nancy, his wife and John Godsey, all of Russell County, 100, 100 acres land in Russell County on Mockerson Creek and in a line of Samuel Cornet. Signed: David Thompson, Nancy Thompson. Nancy, his wife reliquished dower rights. Recorded March Court 1806; survey warrant dated 18 December 1781, surveyed & recorded November 18, 1795

By 1814, David and Nancy Cody Thompson had moved to Warren County, Tennessee. David Thompson was in the local militia company of Capt. Tait in 1814 during the Creek Indian War (Sgt. Martin Johnson, husband of Sarah Combs). Reuben and Dolly Cody Price also moved to middle Tennessee, possibly Warren County. Dolly died in 1849 in Coffee County, Tennessee. Other family members moved to Warren County, including some of the children of Mason and Dorothy Combs.


Scott County, Virginia


William Cody and sons Thomas and Zedekiah remained on Big Mocossin Creek at the foot of Clinch Mountain. This land was incorporated into Scott County in 1814.  The 1815 tax list recoreded William Cody and also Thomas Cody on a farm of 130 acres on Big Mocossin Creek and Zedekiah with 85 acres on the same creek (31). Also present were George Stacy, Meshack Stacy, Meshack Stacy Sr, John Sumner, and William Stacy. All were present in 1820.

1820 US Census, Scott County, Virginia
Thomas Cody 210010-20010 [Thomas b. 1783, m. Molly Bays, later in Perry Co., KY]
William Cody 000001-00001 [and Sinai Stacy Cody]
Zedekiah Cody 010010-10010 [Zedekiah b. 1775-1794, m. Tabitha Osborne ]
George Stacy 100001-30101 [George b.< 1775]
John Stacy 000100-10010 [John b. 1794-1804]
Meshick Stacy Jr., 000010-30100 [Meshack b. 1794-1804]
Meshick Stacy Sr., 030111-20101 [Meshack b.<1775]
John Summers 200010-10010 [John b. 1794-1804]
James Davison Sr. - 000001-10001 [James b.<1775]

William and Sinai Cody have not been found after 1820, although exhaustive research in Scott County has not yet been done. By 1840, the next extant US Census, William was no longer listed, suggesting he died after 1820. Thomas had moved to Kentucky.

1840 US Census, Scott County, Virginia
Zedekiah Codey 1m50-60, 1f15-20, 1f20-30, 1f50-60 [Zedekiah b.1780-1790]
James Codey 2mu5, 1m5-10, 1m30-40, 2f5-10, 1f10-15, 1f30-40 [James b. 1800-1810]

James Cody was the son of Zedekiah and Tabitha Osborne Cody. James married Eve Saunders in Scott County on 9 March 1829 (32). He moved down the Clinch Valley to Hancock County, Tennessee by 1850.

1850 US Census, Hancock County, Tennessee
James Coda 41 VA [James b. 1809 m. Even Saunders in 1829 Scott Co., VA]
Eave Coda 42 VA
Tabitha Coda 21 VA
Margaret Coda 17 VA
Nancy Coda 16 VA
Zedric Coda 12 VA
Frederick Coda 10 VA
Thomas Coda 9 VA
Mary Coda 7 VA
James Coda 3 VA


References Cited

1. Rowan County, North Carolina Loose Estate Papers of Benjamin Boudger, 1762, State of North Carolina Library and Archives, CR085.508.14

2. North Carolina State Library and Archives, Rowan County, CRX 244, List of Gideon Wright (undated)

3. Information on the Stacy and Combs family were kindly provided by Barbara Stacy Matthews, The Stacy Journal (offline; available at www.archive.org for site www.dejavugen.com), and the  The COMBS-COOMBS &c. Research Group, Inc. through the tireless efforts of Carole Hammett; King, G. H. S., The Register of Overwharton Parish Stafford County Virginia 1723-1758, and Sundry Historical and Genealogical Notes, Fredericksburg, VA, Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1961

4. Johnson, W. P., (1974) Surry and Wilkes Co, NC Taxables, 1771-1800, Vol 1, 1771-1777,

5. Wells, A. M., V. G. Phillips and C. J. Leonard (1987) Joseph Winston - His Entry Book, Surry County, North Carolina Land Entries 1778-1781, Mount Airy, NC

6. Taylor, R. J., B. Scates and M. R. McKinley (1974) 1782 Tax List Of Surry County North Carolina, Cimarron, KS 67835

7. Surry County, North Carolina Deed Book C, pp. 293-294 [6 August 1785], In: Absher, W.O, and R. K. Hayes (1981) Surry County, North Carolina Abstracts Deed Books A, B, and C (1770-1788), Southern Historical Press, Easely, SC

8. Rowan County, North Carolina, Loose Estate Papers of William Ridge, 1785, State of North Carolina Library and Archives, CR085.508.136

9. Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions Book 3, p. 197 [October 1794], In: Ferguson, H. W., Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Minutes Of The Court Of Common Pleas And Quarter Sessions 1780-1800, p.146.

10. Surry County, North Carolina Will Book 2, p. 64 [12 July 1754],  In: Linn, J. W., (1992) Surry County, North Carolina, Wills, 1771-1827, Annotated Genealogical Abstracts, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore

11. Revolutionary War Pension Service Application R3355 of Elihu Ayers

12. Crush, C. W. & F. T. Ingmire, Montgomery County, Virginia, The First Hundred Years, Iberian Publishing Co., Athens, GA

13. Kegley, M. B., (1974) Tax List Of Montgomery County, Virginia, 1782, Wytheville, VA

14. Kegley, M. B. (1982) Early Adventurers On The Western Waters, Volume II. The New River Of Virginia In Pioneer Days, 1745-1800, Green Publishers, Inc,. Orange, VA p. 178

15. Schreiner-Yantis, N. & F. S. Love (1987) The Personal Property Tax Lists for the Year 1787 For Montgomery County, Genealogical Books In Print, Springfield, VA

16. Schreiner-Yantis, N. Montgomery County (1972) Virginia Tax Lists A, B & C For The Year 1788, Springfield, VA

17. Kegley, M. B. (1982) Early Adventurers On The Western Waters, Volume II. The New River Of Virginia In Pioneer Days, 1745-1800, Green Publishers, Inc,. Orange, VA

18. Schreiner-Yantis, N. (1972) Montgomery County, Virginia -circa 1790. A Comprehensive Study Including the 1789 Tax Lists, Abstracts Of Over 800 Land Surveys & Data Concerning Emigration, Springfield, VA

19. Sullivan County, Tennessee Deed Book 1, p. 362, In: Families and History of Sullivan County, TN, Vol. 1, 1779-1792

20. Albert, A. R. and E. E. Albert (1973) Russell County, Virginia Personal Property And Land Tax List, 1787 Through 1800, 1802, 1810 And Legislative Petitions.

21. Russell County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 122 [22 February 1791] In: Colley, T. (1995) Russell County Virginia Deed Book 1, 1787- 1795, Iberian Publishing Co., Athens, GA

22. Knoxville Gazette, Volume 3, No. 6 [27 February 1794], In: Eddlemon, S. K. (1988) Genealogical Abstracts From Tennessee Newspapers 1791-1808, Heritage Books, Inc., 1540E Pointer Ridge Place, Bowie, MD 20716, p. 241.

23. Russell County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 305 [10 October 1793] In: Colley, T. (1995) Russell County Virginia Deed Book 1, 1787- 1795, Iberian Publishing Co., Athens, GA, p. 72.

24.  Albert, A. R. and E. E. Albert (1973) Russell County, Virginia Personal Property And Land Tax List, 1787 Through 1800, 1802, 1810 And Legislative Petitions.

25. Dorman, J. F. (1975) Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, Volume Twenty Three, Washington, D.C.

26. Virginia Land Patent Book 42, pp. 358-359 [13 May 1799], Land Office Patents and Grants Collection, Library of Virginia, Electronic Archives, Richmond, VA

27. Virginia Land Patent Book 56, pp. 251-252 [13 May 1799], Land Office Patents and Grants Collection, Library of Virginia, Electronic Archives, Richmond, VA

28. Russell County, Virginia Deed Book 3, p. 614 [22 October 1804], In: Colley, T. (1995) Russell County Virginia Deed Book 3, 1798-1806, Iberian Publishing Company, Athens, GA, p. 169..

29. Virginia Land Patent Book 46, p. 569 [19 December 1800], Land Office Patents and Grants Collection, Library of Virginia, Electronic Archives, Richmond, VA

30. Russell County, Virginia Deed Book 3, p. 710 [04 March 1806], In: Colley, T. (1995) Russell County Virginia Deed Book 3, 1798-1806, Iberian Publishing Company, Athens, GA, p. 198.

31. Kegley, M. B. ( ) Southwest Virginia Tax Assessments, 1815. Grayson, Lee, Scott, Russell, Washington, and Wythe Counties,

32. Fugate, M. D. () Virginia Historic Marriage Register. Scott County Marrriages, 1815-1853, Iberian Publishing Co., Athens, GA
 
 

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