HOME
SURNAME LIST
NAME INDEX
SOURCES
EMAIL US

FOURTH GENERATION

208. Alexander Glenn Beard Photo was born on 27 Jun 1884 in Bull Creek, Travis County, Texas. (32) He appeared on the census on 25 Apr 1910 in 1118 W. 6th, JP #3, 3rd Ward, Austin, Texas.(479) He enlisted in the Texas Rangers as a private in Company B on 11 May 1916 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. He was suspended from Ranger service pending investigation. Resigned on 1 Feb 1919. He appeared on the census on 10 Jan 1920 in Marfa, Presidio County, Texas.(480) He appeared on the census on 9 Apr 1930 in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. (481) He died on 20 Feb 1941 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. (482) He was buried on 22 Feb 1941 in Austin Memorial Park, Travis County, Texas.(483)
Glenn Beard was a Texas Ranger, and was part of a group of 16 Rangers under Captain Jerry Gray that were suspended from duty on February 1, 1917, as a result of a mission into Mexico. Afterwards was a city Marshall at Marfa, Presidio County, Texas, and a bodyguard for an oil company in Tampico, Mexico. Later he was an employee of the Sinclair refining company in Fort Worth, Texas, from 1932 until his death. He had been promoted from fireman to houseman of the Sinclair Plant shortly before his death, and fell ill while going to Austin to visit his mother. He had an operation for appendicitis in 1913.


From the Evening Fort Worth Star Telegram
February 21, 1941, Page 3


ALEXANDER GLENN BEARD

Alexander Glenn Beard, 56, an employee of the Sinclair Refining Company plant here since 1932, died Thursday night in a hospital after a brief illness. He lived at 521 Blevins Avenue.

Mr. Beard had recently been promoted from fireman to houseman of the plant and almost immediately thereafter had gone to Austin to see his mother, Mrs. Mary Beard. He became ill while in Austin and entered the hospital here upon his return.

Besides his mother he is survived by his widow; a son, Frank Beard, Baytown, three daughters, Misses Betty Carolyn and Mary Pat Beard, Fort Worth, and Mrs. A. E. Lozano, Austin; six brothers, a sister, and two grandchildren.

Th Funeral service will be conducted at 4 p.m. Friday at Riverside church of Christ by Willard Mortimer, minister. Burial will be in Austin at 2 p.m. Saturday.


The Austin Newspaper
Saturday, February 22, 1941, page 13

Mortuary

Alfred G. Beard

Alfred G. Beard, 57, former Austin resident, died Thursday at a Fort Worth hospital. Survivors are his widow, four children, Frank Beard of Bayton, Mrs. Isabelle Lozano of Austin, Bettie and Mary Beard of Fort Worth; his mother, Mary Beard of Austin; one sister, Mrs. Parrish of San Antonio; and six brothers, Carl G. Beard and Clyde R. Beard of Austin, Claude W. Beard of Fort Worth, Dick W. Beard of Houston, F. A. Beard of Alpine and Andy J. Beard of San Antonio.

Funeral services will be held at the Hyltin Funeral home Saturday at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Pallbearers will be H. E. Brodie, Jim Belger, Roy McCuistion, C. C. Champion, Jim McCoy and R. W. Potter.


A Biography written by his great-grandson, Monty Waters:


A.G. Beard, Law Officer, by Monte M. Waters, Grandson


Alexander Glenn Beard (who signed his name “A.G.”) was born on June 27, 1884 on Bull Creek, in Travis County Texas. He married Laura A. Brodie in Austin, Travis County Texas on April 15, 1909. A son was born in 1909 and a daughter in 1912 of this marriage. The family lived in Austin and nearby Taylor (in Williamson County).


A. G. Beard’s career as a West Texas lawman.

Beard enlisted in the Company B of the Texas Rangers in May of 1916 during a period when the Rangers were rapidly expanded due to a well-publicized, and deadly raid on Glen Springs Texas. His Company was headquartered at Marfa, Texas. He served at various posts in the Big Bend region of Texas including: Alpine, Marfa, Terlingua, Brite Ranch, and Lobo. He also spent time patrolling the Chisos Mountains, now within the Big Bend National Park. This was during the Mexican revolution and violence was a constant threat to ranches along the border, despite the presence of the U.S. Cavalry and the Texas Rangers.

He helped to keep the peace during the events now called the Johnson-Sims feud in West Texas towns like Snyder, Baird, and Sweetwater. He also served on Governor Ferguson’s personal security detail during the 1917 impeachment crisis.

His company was dissolved and several members discharged in June 1918 because of the role they played in the killing of 15 innocent Mexicans in the border village of Porvenir Texas in January of that year. Beard’s captain, J. M. Fox resigned. Many Ranger histories state that the entire company was discharged, but Beard and a handful of other Rangers were transferred to Captain Jerry Gray’s Company D, which was moved to Marfa. In September of 1918, this became Company B.

He was honorably discharged from the Rangers in March of 1919 when the rangers were forced to reduce the size of the force because of budgetary constraints. He became Marshal of the newly incorporated city of Marfa in April, but persistently tried to re-enlist in the Rangers for a period of months following his discharge. He was unable to re-enlist because of the opposition of Captain Gray.

As Marshal of Marfa, he and others were indicted by the Presidio County grand jury for “robbery with firearms and assault to murder, threat against life and false imprisonment”. No documents survive that provide more information on these crimes and none of the accused was ever tried for them. Separately, he and other ex-Rangers living in Marfa were suspected by the FBI of robbing a Mexican payroll officer of $22,600 at gunpoint in July 1919, though no arrests were ever made.

In August of 1919 he participated in the final punitive expedition made by the U.S. Cavalry against bandits in northern Mexico. He was one of four civilians in charge of four prisoners taken at Carrizo Springs Mexico, when these prisoners were killed. This information came out in 1920 when the commanding officer of the expedition was court-martialed for falsifying his report of the incident. Evidence suggests that the killing was done by two paid scouts hired by the Army.

He served as Marshal of Marfa until about September 1920 at which time he went to work for an American oil company in Tampico Mexico. This employment may’ve been taken to avoid a trial on the charges pending in Presidio County. He lived in Mexico until 1925.

Monty Waters


He was married to Laura A. Brodie (daughter of James Brodie and Hattie Talk) on 15 Apr 1909 in Austin, Travis County, Texas.(484) Laura A. Brodie was born on 12 Sep 1886 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. She appeared on the census on 4 Feb 1920 in Austin/Fredericksburg Road, JP #5, Travis County, Texas.(485) She died on 14 Nov 1922 in Austin, Travis County, Texas.(486) She was buried in Masonic Cemetery of Onion Creek, Travis County, Texas.

Laura Brodie Beard was Legislative Advisor to the Texas Board of Pardon and Parole.

Newsclippings, most undated, probably from the Austin newspaper:

BEARD-BRODIE

Glenn Beard and Miss Laura Brodie United in Marriage

Glenn Beard and Miss Laura Brodie were united in marriage by the Rev. Mr. Garrett Thursday evening at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Brodie, six miles southwest of the city. The bride was born and raised in Travis County and is a charming and popular young lady. The groom is a son of James Beard and is employed by the Waters-Pierce Oil company. Mr. and Mrs. Beard will go to housekeeping on West Sixth Street, where Mr. Beard has recently purchased a home.


April 9, 1913:

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Beard have gone to Austin, where Mr. Beard goes to the Seton infirmary for an operation for appendicitis. - Taylor Democrat.


Obituary

Funeral Notice

Mrs. Laura Brodie Beard, aged 36, wife of A. G. Beard died at home of her mother, Mrs. James Brodie, on the Oak Hill road, at 4:15 a.m. Tueday. Funeral services will be conducted at the residence by V. O. Weed. Interment in Boggy Cemetery. Mrs. Beard is survived by her husband, A. G. Beard; two children Isabelle and Frank; her mother, Mrs. James Brodie; one sister, Dedie Brodie, and five brothers, J. L., T. J., J. C., H. E., and A. B. Brodie.


Mrs. Laura Beard Dies Early Tuesday

Mrs Alura Beard, 36, wife of A. G. Beard, died at the home of her mother, Mrs. James Brodie, on the Oak Hill road, Tuesday morning at 4:15 a.m. o'clock. Funeral services will be conducted at the residence of Rev. Johnson. Interment will be in the Boggy Cemetery.

Mrs. Beard is survived by her husband, A. G. Beard; her mother, Mrs. James Brodie, two children, Isabelle and Frank; one sister, Dedie Brodie, and five brothers, J. L., T. J., J. C., H. E., and A. B. Brodie.



Remaining notes from article on AG Beard my grandson Monty Waters:



[35] Justice, Glenn, Little Known History of the Texas Big Bend, Odessa, Rimrock Press, 2001, quoting a letter from Keil to Mrs J.E. Walker, December 31, 1961, Walker papers in the J.J. Kilpatrick Collection, Archives of the Big Bend, Sul Ross State University, Alpine. Keil also wrote a book that about his Big Bend service, Bosque Bonito, but the quoted anecdote was not included in it.

[36] Adjutant General’s enlistment file for Graham Barnett.

[37] Coffey, Jim and Barnett, John T., “Graham Barnett: Legend in the Big Bend”, Journal of Big Bend Studies, vol. 19, 2007, page101-104.

[38] Adjutant General’s enlistment file for Graham Barnett.

[39] Coffey, Jim and Barnett, John T., “Graham Barnett: Legend in the Big Bend”, Journal of Big Bend Studies, vol. 19, 2007, page111-114, 120-123.

[40] Sadler and Harris, 324-325

[41] Sadler and Harris, 325

[42] The names of the rangers who participated in this incident are from Keith, Noel L., The Brites of Capote, Fort Worth, TCU Press, 1950. Most of these rangers are shown in a photograph on pagexxvii, Holden and Oliphant are also mentioned in the text at page 120.

[43] There are many accounts of this incident. See Harris and Sadler pages 352-356; “Porvenir Massacre” Handbook of Texas, Austin, Texas State Historical Association, 1996, volume 5, page 285-286. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/PP/jcp2.html, Utley, Robert M., Lone Star Lawmen: The Second Century of the Texas Rangers, NY, Oxford University Press, 2007 pages 59-64; Keil, Bosque Bonito, Alpine, Sul Ross State University, 2002; Justice. Little Known History of the Texas Big Bend, Odessa, 2002; “The Canales Report, see fn 3 above. For sources reflecting the Ranger’s version of events see Webb, The Texas Rangers: A Century of Frontier Defense, 2nd ed., Austin, University of Texas Press, 1965; Captain Fox’s report, dated February 18, 1918 is in the Canales Report page 834-835.

[44] Keil in his book Bosque Bonito, says that only two rangers were present, though Captain Fox in his February 18 report gives the number as eight. The issue is complicated by the unknown status of some of those present. Many ranchers were “special rangers” who were permitted to carry weapons and make arrests but were not on the state’s payroll. Andrew Barker was one of the rangers terminated in June for his role at Porvenir, though his warrant indicates he was a “Special Ranger”. Clint Holden has been named as a participant. His resignation before the other participants of his company were fired prevented his suffering that fate but according to Keith, The Brites of Capote, page xliii, he was an employee of the Brite Ranch in January 1918, though most list him as a ranger participant. Though all accounts absolve the army of the killings, Glenn Justice examined the site of the killings and concluded that army weapons were used. See his “Texas History Blog”: “Porvenir Massacre Ballistic Evidence Found”www.rimrockpress.com/blog/index.php?entry=entry080507-081420.

[45] Harris and Sadler page 355. There were actually eight Rangers assigned to the Porvenir operation. By June 4, when the firings occurred, three had already resigned.It isn’t clear which company this is. The famous photograph of the company, mounted is usually labeled as Company A, but Captain Gray, who is in the photograph, was captain of Company D at this date. See Thompson, History of Marfa and Presidio County, Marfa, Presidio County Historical Commission, 1985, volume 2, (hereafter Thompson) pages 164 (photo) and 165 identifying Beard as a member of Company A. For the tenure of these Captains see Stopka, Christina, “Partial List of Texas Ranger Company and Unit Commanders” (2005, Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum) www.texasranger.org/ReCenter/Captains.pbf

[46] Utley, Robert M., Lone Star Lawmen: The Second Century of the Texas Rangers, NY, Oxford University Press, 2007. Page 353-354 (footnote 27)

[47] Handwritten notation on Beard’s warrant: http://tslarc.tsl.state.tx.us/service/RR/b/be/bea1330.pdf.. There is an obvious irregularity in Beard’s reenlistment: It was not endorsed by the Adjutant General until September 10, indicating there may have been some question about accepting the reenlistment. The best known history of the Texas Rangers states twice that all members of this company were dismissed, (Webb, Walter P., The Texas Rangers: A Century of Frontier Defense, 2nd ed., Austin, University of Texas Press, 1965), though A.G. Beard’s service seems to refute this.

[48] See the handwritten subscription on Beard’s warrant and Harris and Sadler, page 511.

[49] Harris and Sadler, page 460. The authors note that many histories claim the Ranger force was downsized following legislative inquiry into abuses by the Rangers, but this is not supported by the record.

[50] Thompson, page192.

[51] Citation needed: A notice signed by Beard was published in the local newspaper. Photocopy in the possession of Caleb Waters.

[52] Harris and Sadler pages 478-480. Though Marshal Beard is clearly implicated in this account, he is referred to as “Jim” Beard and was claimed to have been discharged from the Rangers for his participation in the Porvenir massacre.

[53] Thompson p. 193

[54] From a letter published by the foreman of the grand jury, W.P. Fischer, and T.C. Crosson, clerk of the grand jury, to the district Judge Joseph Jones. This letter was published in the local paper, The New Era on August 9, 1919.

[55] From the same letter quoted above. This portion of the letter was quoted in Thompson p. 189.

[56] From the letter cited above. This portion of the letter was not cited in Thompson.

[57] From the letter cited above. This portion of the letter was not cited in Thompson.

[58] Harris and Sadler, page 478, another entry for Craighead, on page 521 shows he was a “Special Ranger” until May 21, 1919, this was a status frequently given to brand inspectors.

[59] Harris and Sadler, pages 478-9. Barker and Oliphant were fired from the rangers for their participation in the Porvenir massacre, Justice, Little Known History of the Texas Big Bend, Odessa, Rimrock Press, page 157; Utley, Lone Star Lawmen, page 63 and text of fn 27. Pool was present at the massacre, Justice, id. Page149.

[60] Letter published by the foreman of the grand jury, W.P. Fischer, and T.C. Crosson, clerk of the grand jury, to the district Judge Joseph Jones. This letter was published in the local paper, The New Era on August 9, 1919. The other person whose indictments matched those of Craighead and Beard, Jack Rawls, may have been the same person as ranger T.H. Rawls who served until Janurary 1919. Harris and Sadler page 556.



[61] Numerous sources describe this incident. See Hinkle, Stacy, Wings and Saddles: The Air and Cavalry Punitive Expedition of 1919, El Paso, Southwestern Studies, Volume V, no. 3, 1967, and sources cited below.

[62] There are many different versions of this incident which vary in details. The sources which name Beard as one of the escorts are: Thompson, page 195 (though she lists his name as “Baird”); Mogenthaler, The River Has Never Divided Us: A Border History of La Junta de los Rios, Austin, University of Texas, 2004, page 197; Smithers, Chronicles of the Big Bend, Austin, Madrona Press, 1977 page 44-45; Cano and Sochat, Bandido: The True Story of Chico Cano, the Last Western Bandit, Canutillo, Reata Publishing, 1997 page 206. All of these sources (except Smithers who was part of the army unit involved) rely on the evidence and testimony at the subsequent court martial of commanding officer Major James P. Yancey. Yancey was convicted of falsifying his report of the incident, though he was eventually pardoned by President Wilson.

[63] Some sources give the number of men murdered as three. At least one source lists a set of men in the prisoner escort that does not include Beard, see Justice, Little Known History of the Texas Big Bend, Odessa, Rimrock Press, 2001, pages 178-179. Others simply attribute the murders to unnamed “rangers”.

[64] This is the theory advanced in Hinkle, Stacy, Wings and Saddles: The Air and Cavalry Punitive Expedition of 1919, El Paso, Southwestern Studies, Volume V, no. 3, 1967 page 40. Hinkle was a pilot supporting the expedition.

[65] Cano and Sochat, Bandido: The True Story of Chico Cano, the Last Western Bandit, Canutillo, Reata Publishing, 1997 page 206. There is no evidence Cano ever attempted any revenge.

[66] Minutes of Presidio County Court show the dismissal (Cause No. 520, page 192, dated March 1, 1920). Only misdemeanors are tried in the County Courts. Only the dismissal of the case, not a description of the charges could be found in the index. In an adjacent entry in the book of minutes is a similar dismissal of charges against Charles A. Craighead, another former ranger who was serving as a deputy Sheriff in Marfa at the time of the payroll robbery and also implicated by the bureau of investigation (Harris and Sadler, pages 478-479). Craighead had a varied career as a Texas law enforcement officer (Harris and Sadler, pages 47, 190, 248)

[67] Verbal information from Beard’s nephew, Jim Beard.

[68] Information from the “Descendants of Thomas Watt Beard” family webpage compiled by Ernest E. Hunt IV, http://www.mindspring.com/~eehiv/beard/d454.htm





Alexander Glenn Beard and Laura A. Brodie had the following children:

child+665 i. Frank McLaughlin Beard.
child+666 ii. Laura Isabelle Beard.

He was married to Essie Irene Hunter (daughter of Henry Hunter and Elizabeth Carolyn Lee) on 6 Dec 1923 in Clinton, South Carolina. Essie Irene Hunter was born on 6 Dec 1896 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. She died on 4 Mar 1994 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. (87) She was buried in Austin Memorial Park, Travis County, Texas.
From the Austin American-Statesman, Austin, Texas
Monday, March 7, 1994


Essie Irene Beard

Essie (Hunter) Beard, age 97, died Friday, March 4, 1994, in Austin, Texas.

Essie (Hunter) Beard was born near Manor, Texas, December 6, 1896. She spent some of her youth in South Carolina, and was married there to Alexander Glenn Beard of Austin who died in 1941. She lived in Fort Worth, Texas, for most of her life where she worked as an Avon representative and was active in the Riverside and Richland Hills Churches of Christ. Her last three years she resided at Heartland Healthcare Center in Austin.

Essie Beard is survived by two daughters, Betty C. Waters of Manchaca, Texas, and Mary Pat Malloy of Los Osos, California; nine grandchildren; 19 great-granchildren; and one half-brother, Walter Turner of Sulphur Springs, Texas.

Gravesides services 2:00 PM, Tuesday at Austin Memorial Park with Mr. Ken Malloy officiating.

Arrangements by Harrell Funeral Home in Austin, 443-1366.

Alexander Glenn Beard and Essie Irene Hunter had the following children:

child+667 i. Betty Caroline Beard.
child+668 ii. Mary Patricia Beard.