Classless Skills & Powers
Standard Character Generation Example

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This method can be used to create characters mimicking the "standard" classes from the AD&D 2nd edition PHB. Of course, you are encouraged to create custom characters, but here you can see how to make basic characters using this system.

As you can see, 200 character points don't go a long way in this system. These characters are starting with a little less in the way of abilities than they would under core AD&D 2nd Edition rules, with some skimping on weapon and nonweapon proficiencies, etc.

Generic Warrior

After rolling the warrior's ability scores, we choose race - in this case we’ll assume a human with no special abilities. In these examples we won't take into account any Prime Requisite cost reductions or bonus CP for INT. Then, we buy the Required Tree skills for a warrior. Buying into the Melee Combat primary tree and getting four weapon proficiencies is standard for a fighter. Then, some "nonweapon proficiencies" - the warrior buys the Athletics skill tree as a second primary tree, and then purchases Endurance, Running, Throwing, and Swimming. The fighter spends his last points on the Riding skill from the General skill tree.

Skill

CP Cost

Warrior THAC0

40

Warrior Saving Throws

30

Warrior XP Table

20

Warrior Hit Dice

40

Melee Combat Tree Initial Cost

10

Weapon Proficiencies (4)

40

Athletics Tree Initial Cost

5

Endurance

4

Swimming

4

Running

4

Throwing

2

Riding (Land-based)

2

Total Cost

200

 

Generic Wizard

Again, we roll up scores and assume a standard human. We purchase the Wizard entries from the Required Tree and pay the initial cost for the Wizardry tree. We get a weapon proficiency with the staff, and then can only afford spell school access to the universal school and 5 others. We purchase the first rank of spellcasting power, and then the Sagecraft secondary tree and two sage proficiencies (Astronomy and Reading/Writing, which cost double since they're from a secondary tree) which leaves us two points we use to improve our Astronomy rating.

Skill

CP Cost

Wizard THAC0

10

Wizard Saving Throws

35

Wizard XP Table

10

Wizard Hit Dice

10

Wizardry Tree Initial Cost

20

Weapon Proficiency (Wizard)

10

Universal School Access

5

Lesser School Access (5)

75

Spellcasting Rank 1

5

Sagecraft Tree Initial Cost

10

Astronomy +2

6

Reading/Writing

4

Total Cost

200

 

Generic Rogue

We roll scores, choose a human, and buy the Required Tree abilities for the standard rogue. We buy the base level of all 7 normal thief skills and pay the Stealth primary tree initial cost. Then we buy 50 percentile points to spread around on those skills. We spend our last points on Disguise and Gaming from the Stealth tree, and how to speak Orcish. Our rogue is proficient in no weapons, and does not know how to backstab.

Skill

CP Cost

Rogue THAC0

20

Rogue Saving Throws

20

Rogue XP Table

40

Rogue Hit Dice

20

Stealth Tree Initial Cost

12

7 Thief Skills

60

50 Discretionary Thief Skill Points

20

Disguise

4

Gaming

2

Modern Language

2

Total Cost

200

 

Generic Cleric

We roll up another human, and purchase the usual Priest Required Tree items and the Holy Orders primary tree (10 CP). The deity we choose allows our character 8 spheres for lesser access, we choose 5 of them. This deity allows the use of blunt weapons - we choose the mace. After buying the first spell rank, we decide our character's secular calling is to be a painter, and so buy the Arts & Entertainment secondary tree and Painting skill.

Skill

CP Cost

Priest THAC0

30

Priest Saving Throws

25

Priest XP Table

30

Priest Hit Dice

30

Holy Orders Initial Cost

10

Spell Spheres (5)

50

Spellcasting Rank 1

5

Weapon Proficiency (Cleric)

10

Arts & Entertainment Initial Cost

5

Painting

4

1 leftover point

1

Total Cost

200

 

Standard Character Advancement

To stay on the "generic" track, as the characters progress they each spend 5 CP per level on spell rank advancement, thief skill improvement, or investing in multiple attacks. The other 15 CP is used to grow their skill sets.

At fifth level, each character has grown a lot, having earned another 80 CP to spend on improvement - the fighter is specialized in his weapon, has a style specialization, and a couple more weapon and nonweapon proficiencies. The wizard has a specialty school, can use scrolls and other magic items, and is at the 6th level of casting power. The priest is at the 5th level of casting ability, but can now turn undead, has a lesser granted power, and another nonweapon proficiency. The rogue has boosted his skills considerably, adding a weapon proficiency and Backstab, and has obtained other skills like Disguise and Escaping Bonds. They’re not supermen yet, but are all specialized in what they do.

At tenth level, they’ve received another 100 CP and all have many other skills - the mage and cleric had to spend some of those points on getting greater sphere access, but still have plenty more to spend on other abilities. The fighter’s goals of weapon mastery are expensive, but in reach, and the rogue is branching out into all sorts of exotic skills.

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