About the Play and the Playwright

David Hare

David Hare is one of the most critically acclaimed, contemporary British playwrights. A playwright, director and filmmaker, Hare has written sixteen plays for the stage and seven original screenplays for cinema and TV. Racing Demon, which last year completed a successful run at Lincoln Center, was nominated for a Tony and awarded London's prestigious Olivier for Best Play. Skylight, his most recent play, recently played to rave reviews on Broadway.

Racing Demon forms the first part of Hare's celebrated trilogy about the health of three British institutions--the Church, the Law and the State. Racing Demon explores the inner conflicts of the Church of England while Murmuring Judges takes a behind the scenes look at Britain's legal system and The Absence of War examines its political life. In preparation to writing the trilogy, Hare spent five years traveling around England interviewing countless individuals connected to these three contentious institutions. First presented in 1990, Hare weaves these compelling conversations into a rich tapestry in Racing Demon. "My job," Hare believes, "basically consists of turning over the soil of people's lives, making people think about themselves and reconsider their attitudes."

David Hare, former director of London's National Theatre, is one of the most critically acclaimed, contemporary British playwrights. A playwright, director and filmmaker, Hare has written fifteen plays for the stage and seven original screenplays for cinema and TV. Racing Demon, which recently completed a successful run at Lincoln Center, was nominated for a Tony and awarded London's prestigious Olivier for Best Play. Skylight, his most recent play, is currently running to rave reviews on Broadway. Performed widely across the country, his plays include Plenty (New York Critic's Circle Award), Map of the World, Pravda and The Secret Rapture among others. His films include Plenty, The Secret Rapture, Damage, and Strapless.

He has won many awards for Best Play and Best TV Film of the Year, both in the U.K. and U.S. and, in 1985, won the Golden Bear at Berlin for Best Film. His new play, Amy's View, opens at the National Theatre in London next June, and he has just directed a film of Wallace Shawn's The Designated Mourner starring Mike Nichols and Miranda Richardson.


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