The War for Southern Independence
(Civil War)

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Written and compiled  for the

Madaris, Medearis, Medaris, McDaris, McDearis, Medaries
Family Tree Home page.
http://www.mindspring.com/~kellcin/index.htm 

*Information in this Document Will Change as information is obtained and updated. It may be necessary for you to hit "refresh" or "Reload" on your browser to see the latest changes* 


Do You Know Who Any of the Unidentified Soldiers are in this Document? If so Please let us Know. E-Mail Question and Comments to Brian Kelly Madaris  


  The following information was compiled and excerpted from:


Why do we call it the "War For Southern Independence" ?

Click here to read Chapter One from A. P. Adamson's book "Brief History of the 30th Georgia Regiment"

Click on Who you want to see, or scroll on to see them all.
Confederates Union
Alabama Illinois
Arkansas Indiana
Georgia Iowa
Indiana Kentucky
Kentucky Missouri
North Carolina Ohio
Tennessee Tennessee
Texas Texas
Virginia  West Virginia

6th US Vol Infantry

The Confederates



Confederates From Arkansas

Confederate Battle Flag



Robert A. Medearis / Medaris

Sergeant, Company E, 17th (Griffiths) Arkansas Infantry,

Sergeant, Company K, 11th and 17th Griffith's Consolidated Arkansas Infantry.

(Robert Anderson son of Wilson Frank 6, James Wilson 5, Benjamine 4) 


Wilson Medearis / Medaris

Private, Company E, 17th Arkansas Infantry, Griffith's, Company K & H, 11th and 17th Consolidated Arkansas Infantry.

(Wilson Frank son of Wilson Frank 6, James Wilson 5, Benjamine 4)

Organized at Fort Smith, Arkansas, during the fall of 1861. Many of these men were raised in Sebastian, Hempstead, Yell, and Saline counties. The 17th fought at Elkhorn Tavern, lost sixteen percent of the 109 engaged at Iuka, and reported 20 casualties at Corinth. It was then placed in Beall's Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and captured at Port Hudson on July 9, 1863. After the exchange and its reorganization as mounted infantry, the unit was attached to General W. Adams, Mabry's, and Ross' Brigade, Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. In April, 1864, it was consolidated with the 11th Arkansas Regiment and skirmished in several actions in Louisiana and Mississippi. The unit was included in the surrender on May 4, 1865. Its field officers were Colonels John Griffith and Frank A. Rector, Lieutenant Colonel Josephus Dotson, and Majors B. P. Jeff and Walter H. Matheson.
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

John Medaris / Maderias

Sergeant / Private, Company G, 34th Arkansas Infantry

(John Wesley, son of Wilson Frank 6, James Wilson 5, Benjamine 4)

Formed in the summer of 1862. The unit was assigned to Fagan's, A. T. Hawthorne's, and Roane's Brigade in the Trans-Mississippi Department and participated in the conflicts at Helena and Jenkins' Ferry. It continued to fight in some minor actions in Arkansas and Louisiana, then disbanded. Colonel William H. Brooks, Lieutenant Colonels T. M. Gunter and James R. Pettigrew, and Major F. R. Earle were in command.
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

William A. Madarris / Midaris, Madiris

Private, Company F, 36th Arkansas Infantry

(Likely connected to Madara line, still researching)

Organized in January, 1863, and as the successor to McRae's 28th Regiment. It served under McRae, L. C. Gause, and Roane in the Trans-Mississippi Department. The regiment lost fifty-one percent of the 432 engaged at Helena, then skirmished in some minor actions in Arkansas and Louisiana. It was included in the surrender on June 2, 1865. Colonel Samuel S. Beal, Lieutenant Colonel Jeptha C. Johnson, and Major T. H. Blacknall were in command.

Andrew Medaris / Maderias

(Likely connected to Madara line, still researching)

Company I, 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles

Organized at Fort Smith, Arkansas, in May, 1861, with 768 officers and men. Its companies were recruited in Little Rock and Fort Smith and the counties of Chicot, Arkansas, Johnson, Woodruff, White, Lawrence, Pulaski, Yell, and Interdependence. The unit fought at Wilson's Creek and Elkhorn Tavern, then was dismounted. It participated in Bragg's Kentucky Campaign under General Churchill and later was placed in General McNair's and D. H. Reynold's Brigade. The regiment was engaged at Murfreesboro and Jackson and in many conflicts of the Army of Tennessee from Chickamauga to Bentonville. It reported 45 killed, 161 wounded, and 2 missing at Wilson's Creek and sustained 26 casualties at Richmond and 95 at Murfreesboro. Of the 254 who saw action at Chickamauga, forty-two percent were disabled. Its force was greatly reduced when it surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Thomas J. Churchill, M. G. Galloway, Robert W. Harper, and Daniel H. Reynolds; Lieutenant Colonels George S. Laswell, Charles H. Matlock, Lee M. Ramsaur, and George W. Wells; and Major W. P. Campbell.
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

W. A. Maderris

Private, Company E, 10th (Witt's) Arkansas Cavalry

(Likely connected to Madara line, still researching)

Organized in July, 1861, at Springfield, Arkansas. Its members were drawn from the counties of Cleburne, Van Buren, Conway, and Perry. The regiment moved to Union City, Tennessee, where 150 men died from the effects of measles. Later it was involved in the conflicts at Shiloh and Baton Rouge, and in October, 1862, contained 249 effectives. Attached to Buford's and Beall's Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, the 10th was part of the garrison that surrendered at Port Hudson on July 9, 1863. After being exchanged, the men returned to Arkansas and were reorganized as the 10th or Witt's Cavalry Regiment. This unit skirmished in Arkansas and on May 28, 1865, requested from the Federals terms under which it could surrender. Its commanders were Colonels T. D. Merrick and A. R. Witt, Lieutenant Colonels S. S. Ford and Luther R. Venable, and Majors C. M. Cargile and Obed. Patty.
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

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Confederates from Georgia

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Fletcher Madaris

Pvt. / Blacksmith / Ferrier, Company D., Phillips Legion of Georgia, Cavalry Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, CSA. Known as "Phillips Volunteers" and "The Georgia Volunteers".

Served under General James Ewell "JEB" Brown Stuart's Cavalry

(Also listed as Mederis, Medieras)

(son of Thomas 6, John 5, Charles 4) 


Franklin Medaris 

Private, Company E - F, 1st Georgia Regulars, Army of Tennessee, CSA.

Landsman, CS Navy

"The Montgomery Guards" Enlistment Oath March 04, 1861 in Carroll County, Georgia, Newnan. Transferred to Co. F; to the Confederate States Navy, May 03,1864. Initially assigned to the C.S.S. Gunboat "Chattahoochee". Served on C.S.S. Floating Battery "Georgia " (Confederate States Ship) Oct. 01 - Dec. 15, 1864, when he was transferred to C.S.S. Gunboat "Isondiga".. (Also Listed as Medarias)

(son of Thomas 6, John 5, Charles 4)
 

Jefferson Madaris  

CS Navy

Records on Jefferson have not been found. He does not appear in the Archives nor the Roster lists. However, he apparently served in the Confederate States Navy with his brother Franklin. The only information available is his name on a memorial to the Confederate States Navy in Charleston, South Carolina. He apparently died in battle in the Charleston Harbor alongside his brother Franklin.

(son of Thomas 6, John 5, Charles 4)

Memorial to Men of the Navy

(Franklin and Jefferson)

On December 10, 1922, the Ladies Memorial Association of Charleston, S.C., unveiled with appropriate exercise a granite monument to the memory of thirty six men of the Confederate Navy who lie buried in the Cemetery of the Charleston port Society on the Ashley River, Charleston. These graves have individual headstones, but this Memorial more fittingly marks the resting place of these brave men who gave their lives for the Confederacy. The names of ten of them were unknown, so could not be inscribed on the Monument.
The following names appear on the stone: J. Bell, William Brooks, M. Burgress, John Cabell, Lewis Carthegress, J. Caswell, Robert Culbert, John Dobson, T. F. Eagan, J. L. Carlton, T. G. Hatch, C. R. Horton, J. Howell, John Huston, J. L. Jacobs, F. Medearis, J. Medearis, H. P. Rainey, Surgeon Scott, J. C. Shea, H. W. Shields, I. P. Shultz, W. H. Flagg, J. Spear, G. W. Summers, William Yates.
 

Harvey P. Medaris

Company I, "11th Georgia Calvary", Army of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.  Enlisted at Athens, Georgia, on August 15, 1864.
The 11th Cavalry Regiment was organized near Athens, Georgia, on November 14, 1864. The regiment was created by consolidating the newly formed 30th Georgia Cavalry Battalion and four independent cavalry companies raised under the authority of the War Department where the conscript act could not be enforced. The majority of the men were from the Athens and Macon areas of Georgia. The unit was assigned to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and served in M. W. Hannon’s and R. H. Anderson’s Brigade. It fought at Savannah, but many of the men were captured. In February, 1865, only 90 effectives were present and in April most of these were captured at Macon. Colonel Andrew Young, Lieutenant Colonel H. W. Barclay, and Major Madison Bell were it’s commanders.
 

Harvey and his wife Nancy, applied for Confederate pensions in Gilmer County, Georgia. Harvey also witnessed a pension application for Mrs. Louisa J. Payne widow of John Payne of Union County, Georgia.

(Harvey Perkins 6, James A. 5, Rice 5)

Jackson Madaris

Pvt., Company K, 30th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, CSA, Campbell County, known as the "Chattahoochee Volunteers". *Private, enlisted at Camp Bailey near Fairburn, Georgia - Campbell County, Sept. 25, 1861.

     In September 1861, Georgia Congressman David J. Bailey established Camp Bailey with the permission of Governor Joseph E. Brown. Camp Bailey was located between Fairburn and Palmetto, Georgia along the railroad track. The actual location of this site is not known today, but is believed to be under the Owens Corning Plant. Bailey recruited men of Campbell and Carroll Counties along the Chattahoochee River for the Confederacy. This company became known as Company K, the "Chattahoochee Volunteers".
    Company K was joined at Camp Bailey by ten other Companies that were organized from Butts, Bartow, Fayette, Clayton and Chattahoochee Counties in Georgia. On December 16, 1861, the 30th Georgia moved to Griswoldsville in Jones County, Georgia. By the 23rd it was encamped just below Savannah, Georgia.
    The 30th Georgia was involved in several engagements near Savannah. Company K then served at Charleston, and in February 1863 had about 300 effectives. They were brigaded with the 25th, 29th, and 66th regiments, First Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters, and the Fourth Battalion Louisiana.
    The 30th Regiment traveled to North Georgia and fought in the Battle of Chickamauga in late September 1863. Company K remained on detachment until the spring of 1864 along the East Coast, therefore it was not involved in the Chickamauga or Mississippi campaigns. While enroute to Dalton, in North Georgia, to rejoin the Regiment, many of the troops jumped train in Palmetto and Fairburn, Georgia to visit their homes in Campbell County.
Company K continued north and participated in battles at Calhoun, Ga., the Battle of New Hope Church, Kennesaw, Peachtree Creek and the Battle of Jonesboro in the Atlanta Defense. Then the 30th regiment traveled north again and fought battles in Franklin and Murfreesboro, North Carolina, Decatur and Nashville, Tennessee.
    Many of the men were captured in the battles in Tennessee and were taken to Camp Chase Ohio, a Union Prison Camp. They suffered conditions comparable to what the Union soldiers experienced in Andersonville, Georgia. Many starved to death and many were lost to disease and exposure in the extreme cold of the North. Those who exchanged this harsh prison life for signing allegiance to the US were placed in blue uniforms and sent west to fight Indians. They were known as "Galvanized Yankee's", a term for a Confederate Gray soldier coated in Union Blue.
       The loss to this regiment by both battle and disease dwindled it's numbers considerably. Few of the men surrendered under General Joseph E. Johnston on April 26, 1865.

  Jackson joined Company A, 6th  US Voluneer Cavalry, as a Galvanized Yankee.
 
(son of Thomas 6, John 5, Charles 4) 

John Medaris

3rd Sgt., Company D, Cavalry Battalion, Smiths Legion of Georgia, Army of Northern Virginia, CSA, Waffords Brigade, known as "Smiths Volunteers" Under the Command of Brig. Gen. W. T. Wafford, Lt. General James Longstreet, General Robert E. Lee.

Private, Company B, 6th Georgia Cavalry

Smith’s Legion was organized during the spring of 1862 with a cavalry and infantry battalion. For a time the legion was under the command of Colonel Sumner J. Smith. The cavalry battalion raised some of its members in Burke and Telfair counties and contained six companies. It was attached to the Department of East Tennessee, then was involved in the Kentucky Campaign. In the spring of 1863 the battalion merged into the 6th Georgia Cavalry Regiment. Its commanders were lieutenant Colonel John R. Hart and Major Benjamin F. Brown. The infantry battalion recruited many of its men in Gilmer and Floyd counties. Assigned to the Department of East Tennessee, it served in Kentucky and later was stationed at Cumberland Gap and Loudon, Tennessee. During the spring of 1863 the unit merged into the 65th Georgia infantry Regiment. Its field officers were lieutenant Colonel John S. Fain and major Robert H. Moore.
Buried at Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery, Ga.
 
(John H. son of James A. 5, Rice 4) 

Charles W. Medaris

Private, Company B, 6th Georgia Cavalry

6th Cavalry Regiment was formed in the spring of 1863 by consolidating the cavalry battalion of Smith's Georgia Legion and four independent cavalry companies. During the conflict it served in Davidson's, J.J. Morrison's, C.C. Crews', and Iverson's Brigade. The unit was active at Chickamauga and Philadelphia, participated in the Knoxville and Atlanta Campaigns, then took part in the defense of Savannah and the campaing of the Carolinas. During April, 1865, it surrendered with the Army of Tennessee. Its commanding officers were Colonel John R. Hart, Lieutenenat Colonels B. F. Brown and Joel C. Fain, and Majors Alfred F. Bale and John T. Burns.

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(Charles W. son of James A. 5, Rice 4)


Thomas Enzer Medaris

Company K., 39th Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, CSA, Walker County, Georgia. "Walker County Volunteers".

*March 04, 1862. Died in Walker County, Georgia May 07, 1862.

(son of Hiram 6, William H. 5, Rice 4) 


Thomas P. Medaris

Pvt., Company C, 3rd Battalion, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, CSA, Fulton County, Georgia. "Lewis and Phillips Guards" , Originally known as the "County Line Volunteers" *Aug. 31, 1861. Transferred to Co. I, 37th Reg., Ga. Infantry. May 06, 1863. Deserted, took oath of allegiance to U.S. Government at Louisville, Kent. Aug. 10, 1864.

Also listed as Private Co. D, 37th Georgia Infantry at the Archives.

The Third Georgia Infantry Battalion was organized during the early summer of 1861. Originally organized as a three company battalion, the unit was eventually increased to five companies by the time it ceased to exist in early 1863. Company C, was organized in Meriweather County, Georgia. After being mustered into the Confederate Army, the Third Georgia Infantry was ordered to duty at Lynchburg, Virginia. As soon as it arrived there, however, it was ordered to Goldsborough, North Carolina. The unit served there for less than two weeks and was reordered to Virginia. As soon as it arrived in Richmond, it again was ordered away from Virginia. The unit was ordered to Bristol, Tennessee, assigned to the Department of East Tennessee. It served in that command for the remainder of it’s career.
The Third Georgia Infantry Battalion participated in a small number of various type engagements during it’s brief career. The Third was also known by various designations derived from the name of it’s commanding officers. The Third Georgia can be found in historical documents and books listed as: Marcellus A. Stovall’s Infantry, Anthony F. Rudler’s Infantry, Robert E. Wilson’s Infantry, Meredith Kendrick’s Infantry and Zebuloun L. Watters’ Infantry.
Early in 1863 the Third Georgia and the Ninth Georgia Battalions were combined to reorganize the Thirty-Seventh Georgia Infantry. Thomas shows as being in Company I, which was the old Company C of the Third Georgia. It was made of Volunteers from Campbell, Carroll, Coweta and Fulton Counties in Georgia. Later he shows in Company D, the McMullan Guards, made of mostly volunteers from Hart County, from the old Ninth Battalion Company A. The Thirty-Seventh Georgia Infantry was originally organized during the winter of 1861-1862. Not long after being mustered into Confederate service, however, the Confederate War department discovered irregularities in the regiment’s organization. Consequently it appears that the regimental organization was temporarily discontinued and the members of the unit were reassigned to various other Georgia organizations.
The Thirty-Seventh Georgia Infantry served in the Army of Tennessee throughout it’s career. Other designations of the Thirty-Seventh Georgia Infantry were: A.F. Rudler’s Infantry, Joseph T. Smith’s Infantry, M. Kendrick’s Infantry, James A. Sanders’ Infantry, William A. Quinn’s Infantry, J.J. Bradford’s Infantry, R. E. Wilson’s Infantry, W.H.H. Phelps’ Infantry, T. T. Blanchard’s Infantry, J. G. McMullen’s Infantry, W. M. Clark’s Infantry, T. D. Wright’s Infantry and William Hutchinson’s Infantry.
 
* 37th Georgia Infantry was formed partly by consolidation of 3rd & 9th Battalion of Georgia Infantry, May 6, 1863.
Thomas enlisted 09 April 1864 into the 2nd US Missouri Cavalry, "Merrill's Horse Cavalry" for period of 3 years.  He was a substitute for James W. Blue.

(son of Thomas 6, John 5, Charles 4)


Melderis, T.

Private, 29th Battalion Georgia Cavalry.

29th Cavalry Battalion was organized during the winter of 1863-1864 with eight companies and mustered into Confederate service at Lumpkin, Georgia. It was attached to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and for a time served along the Georgia coast in Eastern Florida. The battalion was active in the defense of Savannah and in March, 1865, totalled about 300 officers and men. It continued the fight in Georgia and surrendered with the department. Its commanders were Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Hood and Major Charles H. Camfield.

(unknown)


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Confederates From Indiana

Confederate Battle Flag


Samuel Maderris

Private, Company E, 10th (Witt's) Arkansas Cavalry Regiment, CSA

Enl at Springfield, AR. Ht 5' 7", eyes blue, hair lt, complx fair, born TN.  Paroled 5 Jun1865 at Jacksonport, AR.

(Connection not  yet known)


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Confederates From Kentucky

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Aston Madeira  

Captain, 2nd Kentucky was killed in the Chickamauga campaign on Oct. 20, 1863. He is buried in the Madison City, Cemetery in Morgan County, Georgia.

Organized in August, 1861, at Camp Boone, Tennessee, and became part of the Orphan Brigade or Louisville Legion. The men were from the counties of Hickman, Fayette, Bullitt, Jefferson, Graves, Franklin, Harrison, Scott, Owen, Bourbon, and Anderson. In October the unit contained 832 men and in the fight at fort Donelson its force of 618 was captured. After being exchanged, it saw action at Shiloh and later was assigned to Hanson’s, Helm’s, and J. H. Lewis’ Brigade. The 2nd was involved in the Battles of Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, then participated in the Atlanta Campaign. During the fall of 1864 the unit served as mounted infantry and took part in the defense of Savannah and the campaign of the Carolinas. It reported 13 killed, 70 wounded, and 21 missing at Murfreesboro, lost fifty-two percent of the 302 engaged at Chickamauga (one of them being Capt. Madeira) and totalled 293 men and 214 arms in December, 1863. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered with the Army of Tennessee. The field officers were Colonels Roger W. Hanson, James M. Hawes, Robert A. Johnston, and James W. Moss; Lieutenant Colonels James W. Hewitt and Philip Lee; and Majors William P. Johnston and Harvey McDowell.
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 
Excerpted from "War of the Rebellion"
Report of Maj. Gen. John C. Breckenridge, C.S.Army, commanding division.
Headquarters Breckenridge's Division, Hill's Corps, October __, 1863.
"Account of the Battle of Chickamauga"
 
"This was one of the bloodiest encounters of the day.  Here General Helm, ever ready for action, and endeared to his command by his many virtues,  recieved a mortal wound while in the heroic discharge of his duty.  Colonel Hewitt, of the Second Kentucky, was killed, acting gallantly at the head of his regiment.  Captain Madeira, Captain Rodgers, and Captain Dedman, of the Second; Captain Daniel, of the Ninth Kentucky, and many other officers and men, met their death before the enemy works, (at the Chattanooga road) while Colonel Nuckols, of the Fourth Kentucky; Colonel Caldwell, of the Ninth, and many more officers and men were wounded."
 

Buried in Madison Ga. City Cemetery

(Not related: His G Grandfather was Jacob Medairy, born in Switzerland.. I have his files on record)



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Confederates From North Carolina

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Pinkney J. Medearis

4th Battalion, Jr. Reserve, Company A

Specific information on this regiment is not yet found, but the title “Jr. Reserve” indicates men of the age between 15 and 18 years old.

(son of John Wesley 5, Massey Christmas 4) 

Marion D. Medearis / Medaris

Private, Company D & E, 22nd NC Infantry, formerly, 12th NC Infantry. Resided in Guilford Co. where he enlisted at age 24, on 23 May 1861 Wounded in the head at Mechanicsville, Va. on 26 June 1862. Reported AWOL in Sept-Oct. 1862. Wounded at Chancellorsville, Virginia 1-3 May 1863 . Captured at Petersburg, Va. 3 Apr 1865. Confined at Hart's Island , New York Harbor, until released on 17 June 1865, after taking the oath of allegiance to the US.

(Marion Dennis, son of John Wesley 5, Massey Christmas 4)


John F. Medaris

Private, Company E, 22nd NC Infantry, formerly the 12th NC Infantry, Volunteers. Enlisted in Guilford Co. on 12/24/1861. Hospitalized in Richmond. Va. 8/29/1862. with chronic diarrhea and was furloughed for thirty days on Oct. 19, 1862. Returned to duty on an unspecified date. Killed at Chancellorsville, Va. 5/3/1863.

(John Fletcher son of John Wesley 5, Massey 4)

Formerly the 12th Volunteers, completed it’s organization near Raleigh, North Carolina, in July, 1861. The men were recruited in the counties of Caldwell, McDowell, Surry, Ashe, Guilford, Alleghany, Caswell, Stokes, and Randolph. With nearly 1,000 men, the unit was ordered to Virginia and assigned to the Aquia District in the Department of Northern Virginia. Later it was brigaded under Generals Pettigrew, Pender, and Scales. It fought with the army from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor, took its place in the Petersburg trenches south of the James River, and ended the war at Appomattox. In April, 1862, this regiment contained 752 men, reported 161 casualties during the Seven days' Battles’, had 6 killed and 57 wounded at Second Manassas and 1 killed and 44 wounded at Fredericksburg. It lost 30 killed and 139 wounded at Chancellorsville and of the 321 engaged at Gettysburg, over fifty percent were disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 13 officers and 97 men. The field officers were Colonels James Conner, Thomas S. Galloway, Jr., Charles E. Lightfoot, and James J.. Pettigrew; Lieutenant Colonels Christopher C. Cole, R. H. Gray, John O. Long, and William L. Mitchell; and Majors Laban Odell and W. Lee Russell.
 

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)


J. L. .Medaris

Private, Company F, 6th North Carolina Cavalry, 65th State Troops,

(Joseph L. 7, son of Charles 6, William H. 5, Rice 4) 


Gabriel L. McDaris

Private, Company A, 5th Battalion NC Cavalry, Enlisted in Madison County May 14, 1862 for the war, Present or accounted for until transfered to Company I, 65th Regiment NC Troops (6th Regiment NC Cavalry) August 3, 1863.

(Gabriel Lovin 6, son of Oliver 5, Rice 4)

(credits 00, 25)


Oliver E. McDaris / McDearis, McDarris

Corporal, Co. A & I, 6th NC Cavalry, (65th State Troops). Company A, 5th Battalion NC Cavalry. Enlisted in Madison County July 3, 1862 for the war. Mustered in as Private and appointed Corporal September 27, 1862. Present or accounted for until captured at Irvine, Ky., July 31, 1863. Absent in confinement as a prisioner of war at Camp Chase, Ohio when transfered to Company I, 65th regiment NC Troops(6Th Regiment NC Cavalry) August 3, 1863. Transferred to Fort Del. in Del. Feb. 29, 1864. Paroled and exchanged at Varina. Va. 9/22/1864. No further records.

Organized in August, 1863, by consolidating the 5th and 7th North Carolina Cavalry Battalions. These two units had rendered efficient services in East Tennessee and Kentucky. Many of the men were from Ashe, Burke, Watauga, Transylvania, and Mitchell counties. The regiment fought at Chickamauga, then with other troops in Dibrell’s Brigade gave support to Longstreet at Knoxville. It was then assigned to the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia. Under this command it saw action at New Bern, near Kinston, and along the Roanoke River. It was organized with 520 men and during February, 1864, had 273 present for duty. Attached to Butler’s Cavalry Division, the unit disbanded near Salisbury in April, 1865. The field officer were Colonel George N. Folk, Lieutenant Colonels Alfred H. Baird and Thaddeus P. Siler, and Major John J. Spann.
 

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(Oliver Erwin 6, son of Oliver 5, Rice 4)

(credits 00, 25)


John E . Medaris

Quartermaster Sergeant, Company E, 58th NC Infantry, Formed July, 1862 from 5th (Palmer's) NC Partisan Rangers. Consolidated April 19, 1865 with 60th NC Infantry, forming (new) 58th NC Infantry (State Troops).

Organized in Mitchell County, North Carolina, in July, 1862. Its twelve companies were recruited in the counties of Mitchell, Yancey, Watauga, Caldwell, McDowell, and Ashe. In September it moved to Cumberland Gap and spent the winter of 1862-1863 at Big Creek Gap, near Jacksboro, Tennessee. During the war it was assigned to Kelly’s, Reynolds’, Brown’s and Reynolds’ Consolidated, and Palmer’s Brigade. The 58th participated in the campaigns of he Army of Tennessee from Chickamauga to Atlanta, guarded prisoners at Columbia, Tennessee, during Hood’s operations, then moved to South Carolina and skirmished along the Edisto River. Later it returned to North Carolina and saw action at Bentonville. It lost 46 killed and 114 wounded at Chickamauga, totalled 327 men and 186 arms in December, 1863, and took about 300 effectives to Bentonville. The unit was included in the surrender on April 26, 1865. It’s commanders were Colonel John B. Palmer; Lieutenant Colonels Thomas J. Dula, John C. Keener, Edmund Kirby, William W. Proffitt, and Samuel M. Silver; and Major Alfred T. Stewart.
 

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(John Enzor 7, Rice 6, William H. 5, Rice 4)


Charles Maderis

    Company G, 39th Infantry Regiment
    enlisted 19 May 1862, residence in Cherokee County, North Carolina


    39th Infantry Regiment was organized at Camp Patton, Asheville, North Carolina, in July, 1861, as a five company battalion. In Novem­ber the unit moved to "Camp Hill" near Gooch Mountain where it was increased to eight companies. In February, 1862, it was ordered to Knoxville, Tennessee, where two more companies were added. Its members were from the counties of Cherokee, Macon, Jackson, Bun­combe, and Clay. The 39th took part in the Cumberland Gap opera­tions, then saw action in the Battle of Perryville. Assigned to Wal­thall's, McNair's, and Reynold's Brigade, it fought with the Army of Tennessee from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, then endured Hood's winter campaign in Tennessee. In 1865 it shared in the defense of Mobile. This regiment lost 2 killed, 36 wounded, and 6 missing at Murfrees­boro and had 10 killed, 90 wounded, and 3 missing at Chickamauga. During the Atlanta Campaign, May 18 to September 5, it reported 16 killed, 57 wounded, and 10 missing. On May 4, 1865, it surrendered. The field officers were Colonel David Coleman, Lieutenant Colonels Hugh H. Davidson and Francis A. Reynolds, and Major T. W. Peirce.

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(Charles W. son of James A. 5, Rice 4)

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Confederates From Tennessee

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A. B. Medearis / Madaras

Private, Company H, 19th Tennessee Infantry. Became part of 3rd Consolidated Regiment, Tenn. Infantry about April 9, 1865.

Assembled at Knoxville, Tennessee, during May and June, 1861, and entered Confederate service at Cumberland Gap. The men were recruited in the counties of Hamilton, Sullivan, Washington, Rhea, Knox, Polk, McMinn, and Hawkins. It fought at Fishing Creek, Shiloh, and Baton Rouge, and after serving in the Vicksburg area joined the Army of Tennessee. The 19th was assigned to Stewart’s, Strahl’s, an palmer’s brigade, and participated in the difficult campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta. Later it moved with Hood back to Tennessee and saw action in North Carolina. During September, 1861, it had 812 men present for duty, reported 34 casualties at Fishing Creek, and lost about twenty-five percent of the 400 at Shiloh and thirty-three percent of the 380 at Murfreesboro. the regiment suffered 94 casualties of the 242 engaged at Chickamauga, had 34 disabled at Chattanooga, and in December, 1863, totalled 195 men and 119 arms. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered with 64 men. The field officers were Colonels David H. Cummings, Carrick W. Heiskell, and Francis M. Walker; Lieutenant Colonels James G. Deadrick and Beriah F. Moore; and Majors Abraham Fulkerson and Rufus A. Jarnagin.
 

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(not sure of connection yet, this may be Alfred (7) son of Charles R. 6, John 5, Charles 4) 


Alfred Madaris / Maderies

Private, Company B, 16th Battalion (Neal's) Tennessee Cavalry,

(son of Gabriel 5, Rice 4) 


Hyram Maderius

Private, Company B, 16th Battalion (Neal's) Tennessee Cavalry 

Organized in October, 1862, with four companies, later increased to six. the men were from Roane, McMinn, Rhea, Greene, and Hawkins counties. It served in Pegram’s, J. J. Morrison’s, H. B. Davidson’s, Grigsby’s, and Vaughn’s Brigade. from June, 1863 to March, 1864, the 12th and 16th Battalions were consolidated into a field organization known as Rucker’s Legion. This command saw action at Chickamauga and in Tennessee, and on January 31, 1864, it totalled 171 effectives. During April, 1864, the 16th had 147 members and moved into the Valley of Virginia where it was engaged at Piedmont. It went on to confront the Federals in Virginia and Tennessee, moved to North Carolina, and probably disbanded in Georgia during the spring of 1865. The field officers were Lieutenant Colonel John R. Neal, and Jamors F. J. Paine and Edmund W. Rucker.
 

(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)

(Hiram (6), son of Gabriel Loving 5, Rice 4)


G. L. Medaris

1st Tennessee Cavalry, (Carter's) Company C

Organized in November, 1862, using the 3rd tennessee Cavalry Battalion as its nucleus. The men were from the counties of Rhea, Bradley, McMinn, Roane Bledsoe, Union, Knox, Jefferson, and Claiborne. Also some of its members were raised behind enemy lines, and a few had served in Thomas’ North Carolina Legion. Company C was detached and assigned to A. W. Reynold’s Brigade in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. This company wa active in the Vicksburg Campaign and was captured in July, 1863. Exchanged, it was attached to Waul’s Texas Legion, then returned to the regiment. Company K took part in the Atlanta campaign, the defense of Savannah, and the campaign of the Carolinas. It surrendered with the Army of Tennessee. The regiment was attached to Wheeler’s, Pegram’s, J. S. Williams’, Giltner’s, and Vaughn’s Brigade. It participated in Wheeler’s raid in Tennessee, fought at Murfreesboro, skirmished in kentucky and Tennessee, and was active at Cumberland Gap. For a time it served with the Army of Tennessee, then in April, 1864, moved to Virginia with 248 effectives. After fighting at Piedmont, it saw action in various conflicts in the Shenanadoah Valley with General Early. During the spring of 1865 the unit disbanded. The field officers were Colonels William Brazelton, Jr., and James E. Carter; Lieutenant Colonel Onslow Bean; and Majors Alexander M Goforth, John B. King, and Richard S. VanDyke.
 
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 

(Gabriel Loving 5, Rice 4)


William P. Medaris

2nd Lieutenant, 59th Mounted Infantry, Company A

He was captured on 04 July 1863 at Vicksburg, Mississippi and sent to a the Prison Camp in Camp Chase, Ohio.  He was paroled by Allegiance.


Confederate Parole Records, Vicksburg, Louisiana

                                                                                      Paroled
Last Name - First - MI - Rank           Unit-State-Unit-Company   At
MEDERIS    W        P    2LT            59TH  TN  INF     A       FIELD

Organized in June, 1862, using the 1st (Eakin’s) Tennessee Infantry Battalion as its nucleus. Its members were from the counties of McMinn, Monroe, Carter, Knox, Grainger, Hamblen, and Polk. For a time the unit served at Cumberland and Big Creek Gaps, then was assigned to A. W. Reynolds’ Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. It fought in the Vicksburg Campaign and was captured on July 4, 1863. After being exchanged and reorganized as mounted infantry, the regiment was placed under the command of General Vaughn. It went on to take part in the operations around Knoxville and in May, 1864, an inspection report showed the 59th with 241 present. The unit participated in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, and during the spring of 1865 it disbanded in Southwestern Virginia. the field officers were Colonels James B. Cooke and William L. Eakin, Lieutenant Colonel James P. Brown, and Majors Charles M. Alexander and James F. Love.
 
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 

(son of Gabriel 5, Rice 4) 


William F. Medarus

16th Tennessee Infantry

Organized in June, 1861, at Camp Harris, Tennessee, with 952 officers and men. Its companies were drawn from the counties of Dekalb, Coffee, Warren, Putnam, and White. Sent to Virginia, the unit was active in Lee’s Cheat mountain Campaign and later moved to South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, then Kentucky. After fighting at Perryville it was assigned to M. J. Wright’s, Maney’s, and Palmer’s Brigade, Army of Tennessee. The regiment participated I the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, endured Hood’s winter operations, and saw action in North Carolina. It reported 199 casualties at Perryville and lost fifty-two percent of th 402 engaged at Murfreesboro. Of the 242 at Chickamauga, twenty-eight percent were disabled and in December, 1863, it totalled 212 men and 157 arms. The unit surrendered on April 26, 1865. Its field officers were Colonels David M. Donnell and John H. Savage; Lieutenant Colonels Daniel T. Brown and Thomas B. Murray; and Majors Patrick H. Coffee, Henry H. Faulkner, Joseph Goodbar, and Ben. Randals.
 
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 

(this is likely William 7, son of Rice 6, William H. 5, Rice 4)


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Confederates From Texas

Confederate Battle Flag


O. C. Medaries

Sergeant, Co. I, 12th Texas Infantry

Organized with about 940 men in August, 1861, by Colonel W. H. Parsons. Most of the men were from Hempstead, Fairfield, Georgetown, and Waxahachie, and Ellis and Hill counties. This unit served in Hawes’ and Steele’s Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department and skirmished the Federals in Arkansas and Louisiana. During 1865 it was in Northern Texas guarding the approaches from the Indian territory. The regiment was included in the surrender on June 2. Its commander were Colonel William H. Parsons, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew B. Burleson and John W.. Mullen, and Majors Lochlin J. Farrar and E. W. Rogers.
 
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 

(Oliver C. 6, son of Gabriel Loving 5, Rice 4) 


Wiley W. Medaris

Corporal, Surgeon, Co. G, 16th Texas Infantry

Organized by Colonel G. Flournoy during the summer of 1862. Many of its members were from Belton and Austin, and Washington and Upshur counties. The unit was assigned to Flournoy’s, Waterhouse’s, and Scurry’s Brigade in the Trans-Mississippi Department. It fought in Louisiana and Arkansas, and lost 2 killed and 5 wounded at Milliken’s Bend, had 3 officers and 30 men captured during Banks’ Red River Campaign, and was active at Jenkins’ Ferry. Later it moved to Hempstead and disbanded prior to the surrender in June 1865. The field officers were Colonel George Flournoy, Lieutenant Colonels William H. Redwood and James E. Shepard, and Major Xenophon B. Saunders.
 
(from: Units of the Confederate States Army; Joseph H. Crute, Jr.)
 

(son of Washington Davis 5, John 4)


Confederates From Virginia


A. J. Madera

Private,  Co. B., 12th Virginia Infantry Regiment / 4th Battalion Volunteer Infantry

J. W. Madera

Private, Co. B., 12th Virginia Infantry Regiment / 4th Battalion Volunteer Infantry

 12th Infantry Regiment was organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, using the 4th Battalion Virginia Volunteers as its nucleus. it's members were from Petersburg, Richmond, Hicksford, and Norfolk.  The regiment was assigned to General Mahone's and Weisiger's Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.  It participated in many conflicts from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor, then was involved in the Petersburg siege south of the James River and the Appomatttox Campaing.  THis unit totalled 691 effectives in June, 1862, and sustained 23 casualties at Oak Grove, 69 at Second Manassas, 39 during the Maryland Campaign, 1 at Fredericksburg, and 86 at Chancellorville.  Of the 348 engaged at Gettysburg, only four percent were disabled.  It surrendered 12 officers and 177 men.  The field officers were Colonels Everard M. Field and David A. Weisiger; Lieutentant Colonels John R. Lewellen and Fielding L. Taylor; and Majors Edgar L. Brockett, Richard W. Jones, and John P. May.


George N. Maddera

Private, Co. F., 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment

M. E. Madera

Private, Co. K., 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment, Transferred to Pegram's Battery

William E. Madera / Maddera

Private, Co. K., 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment, Transferred to Pegram's Battery

William F. Madera / W. L. Maddera

4th corporal, Co., K., 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment, Transferred to Pegram's Battery

Wager W. Madera / Maddera

Private, Co., K, 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment, Transferred to Pegram's Battery

16th Infantry Regiment completed it's organization in May, 1861, with ten companies.  However, because of various reorganizations and transfers, the unit contained only seven after November 1, 1862. The men were from Suffolk and Portsmouth and the counties of Nansemond, Isle of Wright, Sussex, and Chesterfield.  (Co., K. was transferred to Pegram's Battery in May, 1861) It served in the Department of Norfolk and in June, 1862, had 516 effectives.  Assigned to Mahone's and Weisiger's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, it fought in many conflicts from the Seven Day's Battles to Cold Harbor, then was involved in the Petersburg siege south of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign.  The regiment reported 91 casualties at Malvern Hill, 154 at Second Manassas, 5 in the Maryland Campaign, and 18 at Chancellorsville.  Of the 270 engaged at Gettysburg, about five percent were disabled.  it surrendered with 10 officers and 114 men.  The field officers were Colonels Raleigh E. Colston, Charles A. Crump, Stapleton Crutchfield, Joseph H. Ham, and Henry T. Parish; Lieutentant Colonels John C. Page and Richard O. Whitehead; and Majors Francis D. Holladay and John T. Woodhouse.

Branch's-Pegram's Battery was organized in May, 1861, with men from Petersburg, Virginia.  It served as infantry with the 16th Regiment, thenwas transferred to the artillery in March, 1862.  The company was assigned to J. R. Branch's and J. C. Coit's Battalion of Artillery.  It was active from the Seven Days' Battles to Fredericksburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Swift Creek and Drewry's Bluff.  It continued the fight by defending Petersburg and wa active in the Appomattox Campaign.  This battery reported 1 man wounded at Malvern Cliff and 2 killed and 3 wounded at Sayler's Creek.  Captains James R. Branch and Richard G. Pegram were in command.


Waverly T. Maddera

4th Corporal, Co., K, 13th Virginia Cavalry Regiment

Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862 at Prince George, O.H., Virginia. is reported present on roll dated Dec. 31, 1864, last roll of company on file. Prisoner of War records show him paroled at Appomattox, Q.H., Virginia, April 09, 1865.

His wife, Richetta E. Maddera, applied for his Confederate Pension on Oct. 16, 1924 at Charles City, Virginia.  She was 74 years old at the time of application. 

E. A. Maddera

2nd Lieutenant, Co. K., 13th Virginia Cavalry Regiment

13th Cavalry Regiment was formed in July, 1862, using the 16th Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus.  The men wer from Petersburg and the counties of Southampton, Sussex, Prince George, Surry, and Nansemond.  It was assigned to W. H. F. Lee's, Chambliss', and Beale's Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.  The unit was active in the conflicts at Fredericksburg, Brandy Station, Upperville, Hanover, Gettysburg, Bristoe, Kelly's Ford, and Mine Run.  Later it participated in TheWilderness Campaign, the defense of Petersburg and Richmond, and the Appomattox operations.  This regiment had 298 men in action at Gettysburg and surrendered on April 9, 1865, with 10 officers and 78 men.  The field officers were Colonels John R. Chambliss, Jr. and Jefferson C. Phillips; Lieutenant Colonels Alexander Savage and Thomas E. Upshaw; and Majors Benjamin W. Belsches, Joseph E. Gillette, and Benjamin F. Whinfield.


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Do You Know Who Any of the Unidentified Soldiers are in this Document? If so Please let us Know.

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The Federals



Union Soldiers From Illinois

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Jacob E. Medaris

Company B, 47th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
residence = unkown
(in 1904 lived in Cherokee County Kansas)

(Jacob Ellsworth 6, son of Abraham 5, Oliver 4)


James A. Medaris

Private, Company B, 2nd Illinois Artillery
residence = unknown

James W. Medaris

Company C, 12th Illinois Infantry
residence = Danville

(James Wood Medearis 7, Malachi 6, Thomas 5, Charles 4)


John S. Medaris

Sgt, Company A, 14th Illinois Infantry
residence = Virginia
Date of Muster - 25 May 1861
Mustered out - 24 June, 1864

 (son of David Tuttle 6, Abraham 5, Oliver 4)


John C. Medaris

Company F, 55th Illinois Infantry
residence =Bushnell
killed in action

(unknown connection)


Joseph B. Medaris

Company F, 55th Illinois Infantry
residence =Bushnell
killed in action

(son of David Tuttle 6, Abraham 5, Oliver 4)


Jason T. Medaris

Company A, 79th Illinois Infantry

(Jason Taylor Medaris 7, Jonathan H. 6, James Davis 5, Oliver 4)


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Union Soldiers From Indiana

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Rufus W. Madaris

Private, Company D, 59th Indiana Infantry

(connection not yet known)

Also listed as Renfus


John R. Madaris

Private, Company A, 33rd Indiana Infantry


(
son of John 6, Thomas 5, Charles 4)

Samuel Madaris 

Private, Company B, 143rd Indiana Infantry

(Likely son of Hyatt 6, William 5, Charles 4)


Stephen D. Madaris

Private, Company G, 115 Indiana Infantry & Company A, 59th Indiana Infantry.

(son of Johnathan H. 6, James Davis 5, Oliver 4)


William Madaris / Medarius / Medearis

Private, Company I 147th Indiana Infantry

Corporal Company F, 68th Indiana Infantry

(connection not yet known, enlisted in the 68th at Wayne Co., Indiana, 02 Aug. 1862, Was mustered out after his term expired.) 


Thomas Medairis / Medarris

Private, Company D, 148th Indiana Infantry

(This may be Emsley Thomas Jr. (7) Emsley Sr. 6, John 5, Charles 4) 


George W. Medaris / Meddaris

Private, Company D, 74th Indiana Infantry

(George Washington (6), son of Washington Davis 5, John 4)


James A. Medaris

Private, Company I and C, 33rd Indiana Infantry

Died 29 Aug. 1864 of wounds, buried at Nashville National Cem. Nashville , Tenn. in Section E. grave 2685

(son of John 6, Thomas 5, Charles 4)


James W. Medaris

Sergeant, Company E, 72nd Indiana Infantry

(James Wood 7, Malachi 6, Thomas 5, Charles 4)


William A. Medaris

Private, Company C, 8th Indiana Infantry

(William A. 7, John Fletcher 6, John 5, Charles 4)


 


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Union Soldiers From Iowa

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John W. Medearis

Company G, 2nd Iowa Infantry

Residence Drakesville, Born in North Carolina. Enlisted May 6, 1861.  Mustered May 27, !861.  Died Dec 5, 1861, Drakeville Iowa of sickness.

(son of Alfred W. 6, John 5, Charles 4)


Waldo J. Medearis

Company G, 2nd Iowa Infantry
Residence Drakesville, Born in Indiana. Enlisted May 6, 1861. Mustered May 27, 1861. Discharged for disability in Missouri, Aug 21 1861.
The Iowa 2nd Infantry was ordered to take control of the lines of the Hannibal and St. Joseph and North Missouri Railroads June 1861 which it did and remained in Missouri until February 1862.
  (son of Charles R. 6, John 5, Charles 4)


Alfred M. Medearis

Residence Davis County, Born in Indiana.  Enlisted Aug 31, 1861 into the 3rd Iowa Cavalry. He mustered Sept 7, 1861.  Wounded May 25, 1863, at Popes’s Farm Ark.  Re-enlisted and re-mustered Jan 01, 1864.  Promoted Eighth Corporal Aug 1, 1864; Fifth Corporal Jan 1, 1865; Forth Corporal March 1, 1865; Third Corporal July 1, 1865. Mustered out Aug 09, 1865, at Atlanta Ga.

(son of Charles R. 6, John 4, Charles 3)


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Union Soldiers From Kentucky

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Salathiel Medaris

Assistant Surgeon in the 15th Regiment, Kentucky Calvalry

This battalion, composed of six companies, was organized at Paducah, Kentucky, in October, 1862, to serve one year.  It was mustered out by companies, at different dates, from the 6th to the 29th of October, 1863, by reason of expiration of term of service.

(Dr. Salathiel Medaris 6, James Davis 5, Oliver 4)

History from Kentucky Military Archives.

15th Regiment Kentucky Cavalary

    Organized at Owensborough, Ky., October 1862, Ordered to Paducah, Ky, October 1862. Attached to District of Columbus Dept. of the Tennessee, to November 1862. District of Columbus Ky., 13th Army Corps, Dept. of the Tennessee, to January, 1863. District of Columbus, Ky., 16th Army Corps, to August, 1863. Detached Brigade, District of Columbus, Ky., 6th Division, 16th Army Corps, to October 1863.

   Service - Garrison duty at Paducah, Ky., and at various points in District of Columbus till October, 1863. Scout from Ft. Heiman into Tennessee May 2 - June 2 1863 (Cos. "A" and "D") Spring Creek, Tenn., June 29 Lexington, Tenn. June 29. Expedition from Clifton in pursuit of Biffle's, Forest's and Newsome's Cavalary July 22-27. Expedition from Paducah, Ky., to McLemoresville, Tenn., September 20-30. Mustered out October 6 - 29 1863. Regiment lost during the service 1 Officer and 2 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 54 Enlisted men by disease. Total 58.

(Credits to Jerry Wilson, Credits 111 for the history information)


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Union Soldiers From Missouri

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John W. Medearis

rank DO Co. D. 2nd Volunteer Missouri Cavalry. Died 1 Mar. 1865. Buried at Miss. River National Cem. near Memphis, Tenn. Section I , grave 26.

(son of Oliver 6, John R. 5, Oliver 4) 


Joseph McDaris

Pvt. Co. H, 2nd Voluntary Missouri Cavalry, 7 Jun 1863 to 1865. Buried in Green Mountain Cemetery, Wright County, Missouri.

(Joseph Sidney 7, son of William H. 6, John W. 5, Rice 4)

(credits 17)


Thomas P. Medaris

        Pvt, 2nd Missouiri Cavalry

       Initially in the Conferate Army, after becoming a POW, Thomas signed allegeance to the US and enlisted 09 Aug 1864 at Jackson, Michigan for a period of 3 years.

(son of Thomas J. 6, John 5, Charles 4)


William Washington McDaris

Pvt. Co. C, 1st Missouri Cavalry, 23 Aug 1862.

(connection unknown)

(credits 17)


John S. Medaris

    Sergeant, 1st Regiment, Missouri Cavalry  This was a temporary assignment, he was officially assigned to the 14th Illinois.

 (son of David Tuttle 6, Abraham 5, Oliver 4)



Rice Medaris

    Private, Capt. William Woods Co. C., 73rd Regiment Enrolled Missouri Militia.

Enlisted 02 Oct. 1874, relieved from duty 20 Nov. 1864

(Rice Puett McDaris 6, John 5, Rice 4)


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Union Soldiers From Ohio

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Elias Madaris / Mederis

Corporal / Sergeant, Company D, 57th Ohio Infantry

(7, Charles 6, Thomas 5, Charles 4)


John P. Madaris / Medaris

Sergeant / Private, Company K & I, 5th Ohio Infantry. (3yrs / 3 months)

(son of Shadrach 6, Malachi 5, Charles 4)


Leonids H. Madaris / Medaris

Private / Private, Company I, 153rd Ohio Infantry.  He enlisted on 02, May 1864 at Camp Dennison, Ohio and was mustered out with the company on 09 Sept. 1864 also at Camp Dennison..

(Leonidas H. Medaris 7, Charles 6, Malachi 5, Charles 4) 


James K. Madary / Maderia

Private / Private, Company A, 155th Ohio Infantry


Thomas Charles Madary

Private / Private, Company I, 10th Ohio Infantry (3 years)


John D. Maderia

1st Lt. / Capt., Company I & H, 73rd Ohio Infantry

An excerpt from  "War of the Rebellion".
Headquarters 73rd Ohio Infantry, Sept. 05, 1862
Account of Col. Orland Smith , on Battles of Groveton and Bull Run, regarding the account of Aug. 30, 1862

"It may not be proper to mention the name of Capt. Madiera, of company H, who at great risk brought off the national color when both color bearers and the entire color guard had fallen."

An excerpt from "War of the Rebellion"

Headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Inspector-Generals Office,
Chattanooga, November 18, 1863

Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Assistant Adjutant-General:

General: I have the honor to call your attention to the following extract from the picket report, dated November 15, 1863, of Eleventh Army Corps:  

Capt. J. D. Madeira, acting assistant inspector-general, Second Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Army Corps, reports additional camp-fires on the south side of Lookout Mountain ; further, that the Twelfth Georgia Regiment is in our front, while the Richmond Examiner, October 30, reports it at Charleston to htis point.  * * * Scouts met the enemy's pickets at Squirreltown Creek, inhabitants reporting one and a half regiments of cavalry at or near Trenton.  They saw three scouting parties of the enemy, 9, 8, and 6 strong.  The last two were infantry, and went back to Lookout Mountain.  A boy ovreheard a conversation, as he reports, between two Sucessionists, that 18,000 men had arrived on the mountain this morning (15th).  Another rumor is current amongst the inhabitants that Stevenson's division has arrived on the mountain.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. L. Johnson,
Captain and Acting Assistant Inspector-General

David H. Madery / Medary

Corporal / Corporal, Company B, 6th Ohio Infantry


Marcellus Medaris

Private / Corporal, Company K, 12 Ohio Cavalry


Benton Medary

Private / Corporal, 4th Indys Company, Ohio Cavalry


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Union Soldiers From Tennessee

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James W. Medaries

Private Company C, 2nd Tennessee Infantry, USA. Also known as the 2nd East Tennessee Mounted Infantry.

James enlisted on 21 Aug 1861 at age 23. He was active until 6 Nov 1863 when he was captured at Rogersville, Tennessee. He was confined at Belle Isle and Andersonville, Ga. Prison where he died on 23 August 1864 from Scorbutus (Scurvy). James is buried in grave # 6555 in Section E, at Andersonville's Memorial Cemetery. Grave is Marked.

This regiment was organized on August 20, 1861 at Camp Dick Robinson, Kentucky. The majority of the men were from East Tennessee. They were at Mill Springs and Stone River. It became a mounted regiment in June 1863. They participated in the pursuit of confederate raider John Hunt Morgan through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio in July, 1863. They returned to Tennessee and were engaged in the Battle of Blue Springs on October 10, 1863. Two thirds of the regiment was captured at the Battle of Rogersville in Hawkins County, Tennessee on November 6, 1863. The majority of those captured died at confederate prison camps before the end of the war. The remainder of the regiment was mustered out on August 3, 1865.

(James Wilson Medearis (7) son of Henry Massey 6, James Wilson 5, Benjamine 4) 


Joel B. Medaris

Private/ O. Sgr. / Sgr., Company E, 7th Tennessee Calvary Regular, USA

Listed as "Madaris, Joel B., 1st Sgt., E Co., 7th Cavalry" in Tennesseans in the Civil War, Part I and Part II, Centennial Press, Nashville, TN., 1964.

He seved in the Union cavalry. The Captain of E Company was Pleasant K. Parsons. The Company was organized in Carroll County, TN, where Joel Bug lived. He enlisted on 28 Jun 1862 at Huntington, Tennessee. On December 20, 1862, he was captured near Trenton in West Tennessee. He died on September 20, 1864, in Savannah, Georgia, from disease contracted while a prisoner of war, according to a Union death record found at the Tennessee State Archives. He was 34 years old when he died.  Benjamin Washington Medearis, the father of Robert Earnest and Walter Malcolm Medearis, was only five years old at the time of his father's (Joel Bug's) death. His widow Mary? Haywood? Butler Medearis was listed in the 1890 Census on a schedule of the Union Veterans and Widows. She could not be found in the 1900 census, so the exact date of her death and where she is buried requires further research.(credits 17)

Pension Applied for: Cr-17-1, Mary H. Widow of , 7 - 6 ? to 1861, Buena Vita P.O. 

(Joel Bug 6, son of Benj. Whitehead Hicks 5, John 4)



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Union Soldiers From Texas

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T. E. Medearis

Shannons Co., 2nd Cherokee Regiment, USA.



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Union Soldiers From West Virginia

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Nicholas Medera

Lieutenant, Sixth Regiment, West Virginia, Cavalry

Killed in Action, April 08, 1864, in a skirmish at Winchester, Virginia.   



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Union Soldiers in the 6th U.S. Volunteer Infantry

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Jackson Madaries

Private, Company A, 6th U.S. Volunteer Cavalry, "Galvanized Yankees".

(Jackson Madaris, son of Thomas J. 6, John 5, Charles 4)

Organized at Columbus, Ohio, Camp Morton, Ind., and Camp Douglas, Ill., April 2, 1865. Ordered to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, May, 1865, arriving there May 11. Moved to Fort Kearney, Neb., May 14; thence to Julesburg, Colo. Duty in District of the Plains and Utah till November, 1866. Mustered out November 3, 1866.

    The soldiers of the 1st through 6th  U.S. Volunteer Infantry regimens were Confederate prisoners of war who gained their release from prison by enlisting in the Union Army.  The first so-called Galvanized Yankees wer enlisted between January and April 1864 at the prison at Point Lookout, Maryland., and were organized into a unit which in late March was officially designated the 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry. Shortly thereafter, this regiment was ordered to Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., wher it was assigned routine police duty.  Because Gen. U. S. Grant, among others, did not believe taht ex-Confederate troops should be assigned to areas where they might have to fight their former comrades in arms, on August 9, 1864, the 1st U.S. Volunteer Infantry was ordered to the Nortwestern Frontier to help quell the uprisings of the Plains Indians.
    Between September 1864 and May 1865, five more regiments were raised from amont the prisoners of incarcerated at Rock Island, Alton, Campt Douglas, and Camp Morton in Illinois; at Columbus, Ohio; and at Point Lookout, Maryland.  All six regiments served in the West, where they protected settlers from Indians, restored stage and mail service, guarded survey parties for teh Union Pacific Railroad, escorted supply trains, and rebuilt telegraph lines.  The last Galvanized Yankees were mustered out of service in November 1866.



Do You Know Who Any of the Unidentified Soldiers are in this Document?

If so Please let us Know. E-Mail Question and Comments to Brian Kelly Madaris