Subject: Re: Lady Di. so what.

Date: 13 Sep 1997 19:45:52 GMT

From: popeanon@lava.net (Pope C the Anonymous)

Organization: LavaNet, Inc.

Newsgroups: alt.slack, talk.bizarre

Followup-To: alt.slack, talk.bizarre

References: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4

 

C.Jay (jacobt@concentric.net) wrote:

: I think I know why Di meant a lot to people. It shown that anyone can

: die.

Thus showing the sound grasp on reality held by the common [ British |

American | Australian ] citizen.

"Wow! People can die! I never knew that! Even rich people!"

Of course, this still doesn't mean that they can complete the syllogism

from the generalization to the specific and live with the thought and

implications of their own death.

 

: Look at her see had every thing from fame to riches.

This sentence no grammar.

Ignoring your incapacity to form a coherent sentence, however, the

space of attributes not covered by "fame to riches" covers a rather

large ground, such as those to which Nik alluded: grinding poverty and

the sure knowledge that you will never escape it, destitute childhood,

childhood abuse, debilitating physical illnesses, parasitic

infestations, crippling labor, accidental mutilation by stray

ordinance, witnessing the mass murder of your friends and relatives,

and other things that form the reality of life for the bulk of this

world's population.

 

: Also the

: fact that she was a giving person to all that have know her.

Since I've already beaten on you about the grammar:

Most people are giving towards those who know them.

The only thing in any way unique about Princess Diana is that she had

the unique experience of being used as a brood mare or incubator by the

parasitic British royal family, and then discarded.

The only thing morally special about her was that she had the wit to

recognise this gave her some sort of bizarre pseudo-importance in the

eyes of the less intelligent, and that she actually made some vague

efforts to use this dubious status to convince people to do things

which would benefit the general world population, in terms of relieving

them of some of those non-"fame to riches" experiences I mentioned

above. Land mines, for instance. I think being opposed to

indiscriminate use of land mines is generally a good thing.

To sum up, despite her overprivileged upbringing, she managed to

eventually raise herself roughly to the moral caliber of the average

human being. The only surprising or thing about this is that it is so

rare among "celebrities."

-- C

--

Pope C the Anonymous

popeanon@lava.net

"The road to hell gets a total resurfacing..." -- Jim Woodring

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