From mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net Fri Jan 16 03:08:47 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: electricity

From: mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net (Michael Townsend)

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 06:08:47 -0500

 

YOU try going 7 days without it.

 

--

mtownsend@earthlink.net po box 4722 portland me 04112-4722

I just ate "Bob"

 

From petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk Fri Jan 16 04:24:52 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk>

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 12:24:52 +0000

 

Michael Townsend wrote:

>

> YOU try going 7 days without it.

>

 

All you need is gas and lamp oil. And stuff that uses them.

 

Whining addict!

 

--

Sa-ti muste vampirii curul!

 

From !!!bmyers@ionet.net Fri Jan 16 05:08:27 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: !!!bmyers@ionet.net (TarlaStar)

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 13:08:27 GMT

 

mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net (Michael Townsend) wrote:

 

>YOU try going 7 days without it.

 

So...how long has it been since you've had a nice hot shower, Dad?

 

 

Tarla

betting generator sales

skyrocket in Maine

****

Dammit Jeb, I'm as Amish as the next guy, but if we don't take

out that sub, there won't be a Pennsylvania to go home TO!

--my son, Eric.

***

Rev. Mutha Tarla Star ://www.ionet.net/~bmyers/homepage.html

 

 

From mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net Sat Jan 17 14:39:34 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net (Michael Townsend)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 17:39:34 -0500

 

In article <69nodk$cnb@snews1.zippo.com>, !!!bmyers@ionet.net (TarlaStar) asked:

 

--> So...how long has it been since you've had a nice hot shower, Dad?

 

Um, about 5 hours ago I guess. My power came back on Wednesday night, the

7th day. During the outage I had places to shower anyway. I might have had

to sleep in a down sleeping bag with a kerosene heater and a handful of

flashlights and candles and - praise "Bob" - my battery-powered radio, but

I had no wish to SHTINK like a Brit as well!

 

From: Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk>

--> All you need is gas and lamp oil. And stuff that uses them.

-->

--> Whining addict!

 

Right, as if that's how you live asshole. What about the Canadians, where

they can't buy gasoline because the pumps don't work. And can't get cash

because the ATMs don't work. And can't get to the bank because there's no

gas in the car. And can't buy food or lamp oil because they can't get any

money.

 

How you gonna run a big mother generator without fuel, Lurch?

 

From: toxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

 

--> Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

--> without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

--> hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

--> wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

 

No, I don't. Does this mean that you do need electricity, even if you

don't need indoor plumbing? See, my question was, how many of you "whining

addict" internet junkies could really go for a prolonged time WITHOUT

ELECTRICITY?

 

From: UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar)

 

--> (P.S.: Fuck you Dad, you old crank.)

 

Thanks! You should talk ya big windbag. Actually, I did a pretty good job

of maintaining my Slack (once I got the ladies out of the house and in

warm beds at a neighbor's) through the week - although, ok I'll admit, I

started to lose it the last couple of days when it became apparent to me

that the electric company had overlooked my block, and despite the DOZENS

of times I called their automated outage reporting system, they pretty

much believed my power was on. Finally had to EMAIL the fuckers (from

work) to get noticed.

 

See, I'm a city boy. If you live out on a farm somewhere, well maybe you

can accept living in the dark and cold, maybe you can even shrug off

having to let the livestock die or whatever. I got tape decks and

computers and keyboards and radios and TVs to tend!

 

--

mtownsend@earthlink.net po box 4722 portland me 04112-4722

dad's new slacks

 

From nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com Sat Jan 17 23:26:33 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 07:26:33 GMT

 

mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net (Michael Townsend) wrote:

 

>From: toxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

>

>--> Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

>--> without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

>--> hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

>--> wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

>

>No, I don't. Does this mean that you do need electricity, even if you

>don't need indoor plumbing? See, my question was, how many of you "whining

>addict" internet junkies could really go for a prolonged time WITHOUT

>ELECTRICITY?

 

 

Well, I did six months easy in Santa Cruz, so I'd say six months,

provided I got to pick the months. I'd want six well-lit months---

definitely not January and February.

 

Need electricity? Yeah, for the life I'm living now I do. If I wanted

to punt writing and opening a nursery and being busy, I could go live

on a nice warm beach somewhere and gladly do without the power lines.

 

There's a huge space between necessity and luxury that's called, as

Lurch put it, convenience. Convenience and TOYS, let's call it. I like

convenience and toys as well as most people I suppose. I don't find

outhouses an inconvenience at all. Not having a hot shower is mildly

to extremely inconvenient, but it doesn't cross the line into

necessity. Electricity IS necessary, because I need a pump to water

the plants, and something to power the computer for writing, and a

Juno 106 to make the good whooshy noises for Gription Clench.

 

But I'm not much of an internet junkie anyway, so maybe you weren't

talking at me.

 

SPOTS

"I'm a rug, you can lay me down..."---Fetchin Bones

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sun Jan 18 01:49:14 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 09:49:14 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 17:39:34 -0500, mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net (Michael Townsend) wrote:

 

>In article <69nodk$cnb@snews1.zippo.com>, !!!bmyers@ionet.net (TarlaStar) asked:

>

>--> So...how long has it been since you've had a nice hot shower, Dad?

>

>Um, about 5 hours ago I guess. My power came back on Wednesday night, the

>7th day. During the outage I had places to shower anyway. I might have had

>to sleep in a down sleeping bag with a kerosene heater and a handful of

>flashlights and candles and - praise "Bob" - my battery-powered radio, but

>I had no wish to SHTINK like a Brit as well!

>

>From: Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk>

>--> All you need is gas and lamp oil. And stuff that uses them.

>-->

>--> Whining addict!

>

>Right, as if that's how you live asshole. What about the Canadians, where

>they can't buy gasoline because the pumps don't work. And can't get cash

>because the ATMs don't work. And can't get to the bank because there's no

>gas in the car. And can't buy food or lamp oil because they can't get any

>money.

>

>How you gonna run a big mother generator without fuel, Lurch?

 

runs on propane. Gas generators aren't worth a shit for the reasons you mentioned. Barring

sabotage, I can run it for a couple months without taking a trip anywhere or having

anything delivered. In fact, I don't have to go anywhere and get ANYTHING for a couple

months, unless someone gets really sick.

 

You CAN rathole gas, too, if you want. I have a bit. But it goes bad over time and you

have to stick stabilizers and shit in it. But I realize doing any of this stuff is an

option that's not available to city dwellers. But I don't live in the city.

 

You COULD get an inverter (mail order jobs are cheap now) and gel battery or two and keep

them in a closet . The 1500-2500 watt jobs are cheap now. You wouldn't be able to run big

stuff like washing machines, but it would handle lights and stereos and TV's and such.

When the batteries get drained you can lug them outside and charge it off of your car

(har. provided you got some gas stashed somewhere or can get some or siphon some out of a

car belonging to some elderly couple that yer pretty sure has froze to death in their

unheated house).

 

>From: toxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

>

>--> Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

>--> without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

>--> hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

>--> wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

>

>No, I don't. Does this mean that you do need electricity, even if you

>don't need indoor plumbing? See, my question was, how many of you "whining

>addict" internet junkies could really go for a prolonged time WITHOUT

>ELECTRICITY?

 

Can't speak for the others. But I think I'd survive. I just never figured it was

something I wanted to do, unless I decided when to do it. So I decided not to.

 

lurch

 

 

From dallastexas@makinityourself.net Fri Jan 16 12:28:49 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: dallastexas@makinityourself.net

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 20:28:49 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 17:57:17 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>

>I went longer than that a few years back, but I had an 2500 watt

>inverter and a bunch of car batteries. I have a big propane generator

>wired directly to the bus bars in my power box now, as well as a

>shitload of unwanted company whenever we have an outage, which we do,

>pretty often. I wish I'd never told anybody about it.

 

Going without it is easy, getting too much all at once is a pain in the ass.

This is getting weird, I hear more and more people talking about doing their own

voltage nowdays.

We used to use one to back up the water pump - had to join a water co-op though, so

the well is only used for irrigation.

I have jacked a couple of coleman-style generators to the house, I have been looking

for a auto-cut in model, seem to cost about $7000 for the bottom of the line.

I have five UPS's that supply most of the lamps that are normally on at night, and

the computers. I had one pc blow up last summer when lightining hit the ground about

a half-mile from here. It went straight through the UPS - which was toasted also.

Also cooked the airconditioner compressor, the blower fan motor and some small shit.

Lost about 8 grand in one lighting strike. Other than that it had been over 20

years since we had a loss due to lightning - well at least one we could blame on the

lightning.

 

The bad part is when the power is out - which is often - we can hear a neighbor or

two talking in the distance - "hey their lights are on over there why are ours out?"

 

My wife checks on some of the older folks around here if the juice is off for more

than a couple of hours - I might loan out a generator if someones heart/lung/kidney

machine needed to run. I don't know if I would charge them for the gas or not. I

hope those fucks dont get any ideas about running over to my house and tracking in

mud and shit all over the place and eating up all the snacks.

 

If I crank up a generator its just to keep the referigarator and freezer running,

plus I can drop the line when those big lightning storms roll in, and try to keep

the damage down. Earth grounds are going to become a growth industry.

 

RiM

 

From petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk Fri Jan 16 13:56:33 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk>

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 21:56:33 +0000

 

dallastexas@makinityourself.net wrote:

>

> On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 17:57:17 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

 

> >>YOU try going 7 days without it.

> >

> >I went longer than that a few years back, but I had an 2500 watt

> >inverter and a bunch of car batteries. I have a big propane generator

> >wired directly to the bus bars in my power box now, as well as a

> >shitload of unwanted company whenever we have an outage, which we do,

> >pretty often. I wish I'd never told anybody about it.

>

> Going without it is easy, getting too much all at once is a pain in

> the ass. This is getting weird, I hear more and more people talking

 

[more crap about generators deleted]

 

I like to point out to you incredibly dumb bastards that if you're

generating electricity with your fuck-off-big generator down in your

concrete cased survivalist bunker then you're NOT going without

electricity, and you can still watch TV. You dirty fuckers, why not

FOLLOW THE FUCKING SCRIPT INSTEAD OF ATTEMPTING TO WITTILY AD-LIB?

 

From dallastexas@fuckshitdammitiforgottoputafuckingfakeaddressinandthedamnthingbounced.net Fri Jan 16 16:06:47 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: dallastexas@fuckshitdammitiforgottoputafuckingfakeaddressinandthedamnthingbounced.net

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 00:06:47 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 21:56:33 +0000, Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk> wrote:

>[more crap about generators deleted]

[all generator crap deleted - fuck you and your big assed dirty teeth Hipwell]

 

>I like to point out to you incredibly dumb bastards that if you're

>generating electricity with your fuck-off-big generator down in your

>concrete cased survivalist bunker then you're NOT going without

>electricity, and you can still watch TV. You dirty fuckers, why not

>FOLLOW THE FUCKING SCRIPT INSTEAD OF ATTEMPTING TO WITTILY AD-LIB?

 

This one time the lights went off for 79 or 91 days, my ol lady kept forgetting to

pay the bill, and we had all these little people living with us, so they had to

decide weather to eat cheze whiz or ez-cheeze with their Tom's Peanut Crackers and

wot was the bestest way to heat vienna sausages - on the asphalt during rush hour or

to stick them up the dogs ass. Well the damn things took forever to warm up on the

frozen tundra of the highway, so they decided to stick these lovely sausages up the

terriers ass. Not that they liked the taste of dog ass mind you, they kept breaking

their stainless steel caps off on the rock hard frozen weiners. I never questioned

their motives, you know one persons dogs ass is another mans heat source.

 

issat better?

 

 

RiM

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sat Jan 17 14:56:56 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 22:56:56 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 21:56:33 +0000, Peter Hipwell <petehip@cogsci.ed.ac.uk> wrote:

 

>dallastexas@makinityourself.net wrote:

>>

>> On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 17:57:17 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

>

>> >>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>> >

>> >I went longer than that a few years back, but I had an 2500 watt

>> >inverter and a bunch of car batteries. I have a big propane generator

>> >wired directly to the bus bars in my power box now, as well as a

>> >shitload of unwanted company whenever we have an outage, which we do,

>> >pretty often. I wish I'd never told anybody about it.

>>

>> Going without it is easy, getting too much all at once is a pain in

>> the ass. This is getting weird, I hear more and more people talking

>

>[more crap about generators deleted]

>

>I like to point out to you incredibly dumb bastards that if you're

>generating electricity with your fuck-off-big generator down in your

>concrete cased survivalist bunker then you're NOT going without

>electricity, and you can still watch TV. You dirty fuckers, why not

>FOLLOW THE FUCKING SCRIPT INSTEAD OF ATTEMPTING TO WITTILY AD-LIB

 

I didn't have any good candlelight and Campbell's soup on the campstove sitting around the

darkened house playing pinochle while wrapped up in an injun blanket with a flashlight in

my teeth and cooking mushmellons on a coathanger over a fire in the wastebasket and having

a really big time with people I normally would have been ignoring stories.

 

Anyway, point taken. But while I go without electricity (and most everything else) and sit

on the dirt in both the daylight and in the dark fairly often for fairly long periods of

time, don't force me to prove how boring the on-topic accounts and descriptions of such

self-imposed psuedo-monkisk do it to have done it and not to be doing it excursions can

be. You'd be begging me to talk about generators faster than you could say Freezer Fulla

Rotten Meat.

 

 

 

lurch

 

From truwe@miNd.net Fri Jan 16 15:23:38 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: truwe@miNd.net

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 15:23:38 -0800

 

dallastexas@makinityourself.net wrote:

> The bad part is when the power is out - which is often - we can hear a neighbor or

> two talking in the distance - "hey their lights are on over there why are ours out?"

 

Man. I may just be naïve, but that sounds BAD. I mean, it sounds like

peasants-with-torches-raiding-Castle-Frankenstien BAD. Like that

episode of Twilight Zone where the doctor had the bomb shelter and no

one else did and they all tried to get in, but it wasn't really time to

die so they all felt really bad.

 

Blackout curtains. You need blackout curtains.

 

Annnnnnnnnnna

--

|<truwe@mind.net> | Ben, Shelley, Matie and/or Anna *** 113 Earls! |

|38 Daves ******** "Given the choice between accomplishing something

| * and just lying around, I'd rather just lie around. No contest."

|--Eric Clapton | Ignore alt.slack.devo | Ditto annna@earthling.net|

--------------------------------------------------------------------

 

From fake@email.address.mil Sat Jan 17 06:39:36 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: fake@email.address.mil (Rev. Matthew A. Carey)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 14:39:36 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 15:23:38 -0800, truwe@miNd.net wrote:

 

>dallastexas@makinityourself.net wrote:

>> The bad part is when the power is out - which is often - we can hear a neighbor or

>> two talking in the distance - "hey their lights are on over there why are ours out?"

>

>Man. I may just be naïve, but that sounds BAD.

 

 

 

One there was a power outage in my neighborhood so I thought I'd walk

around in the dark to check out the chaos. As I was walking down the

street I saw this college kid walk out of his house with a flashlight

and say to someone inside "I dunno. I'm gonna check the fusebox!"

 

Yeah, THAT'LL FIX IT.

 

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Strange new text files at: http://www.humboldt1.com/~carey/text/

New cassette list at: http://www.humboldt1.com/~carey/tapes/

 

email is: carey(at)humboldt1.com

 

postal is: Matthew Carey

PO Box 594

Arcata, CA 95518

 

From snorts@erratix..com Fri Jan 16 16:05:18 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 00:05:18 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 20:28:49 GMT, dallastexas@makinityourself.net

wrote:

 

>On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 17:57:17 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

>>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>>

>>I went longer than that a few years back, but I had an 2500 watt

>>inverter and a bunch of car batteries. I have a big propane generator

>>wired directly to the bus bars in my power box now, as well as a

>>shitload of unwanted company whenever we have an outage, which we do,

>>pretty often. I wish I'd never told anybody about it.

>

>Going without it is easy, getting too much all at once is a pain in the ass.

>This is getting weird, I hear more and more people talking about doing their own

>voltage nowdays.

>We used to use one to back up the water pump - had to join a water co-op though, so

>the well is only used for irrigation.

>I have jacked a couple of coleman-style generators to the house, I have been looking

>for a auto-cut in model, seem to cost about $7000 for the bottom of the line.

 

I didn't pay anywhere NEAR that for my rig. But it's not an auto. I

just throw the main and start the generator. Got some light bulbs

wired into the box above the main breaker that let me know when the

power comes back on. Anyway, you can pick up 10,000-plus watt

generators for cheap if you watch the paper and are willing to wait

until you find someone who's desperate for cash. They are heavy and

hard to get rid of in a hurry. It's a lot easier to sell the shitty

little 1500 watt jobs than it is a big one.

 

 

>I have five UPS's that supply most of the lamps that are normally on at night, and

>the computers. I had one pc blow up last summer when lightining hit the ground about

>a half-mile from here. It went straight through the UPS - which was toasted also.

>Also cooked the airconditioner compressor, the blower fan motor and some small shit.

>Lost about 8 grand in one lighting strike. Other than that it had been over 20

>years since we had a loss due to lightning - well at least one we could blame on the

>lightning.

 

I lost an air conditioning compressor that way once, but other than

that I've been lucky, Fried a few modems, but hell, the dam things are

designed to get fried. The best kind of toy is a toy that breaks.

 

lurch

 

From dallastexas@confucioussaycusterfullashit.net Fri Jan 16 20:39:05 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: dallastexas@confucioussaycusterfullashit.net

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:39:05 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 00:05:18 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

 

> Fried a few modems, but hell, the dam things are

>designed to get fried. The best kind of toy is a toy that breaks.

 

Damn Lurch don't start talking about toys, we're catching shit for having a fucking

battery or generator !

Back to the earth man, quick before civilization catches up with us and

crams comfort down our throats.

 

You still got yer "Earth" shoes ? I was going to mention my new tractor it's one of

the hydrostatic drives, electric clutch, pto, ground-engaging, with disk, furrow, and

60" mower - Big fat tires and everything. I love her, I need her, she's all mine.

 

HAHAHAHAHAHA

 

RiM

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sat Jan 17 03:30:59 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 11:30:59 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:39:05 GMT,

dallastexas@confucioussaycusterfullashit.net wrote:

 

>On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 00:05:18 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

>

>> Fried a few modems, but hell, the dam things are

>>designed to get fried. The best kind of toy is a toy that breaks.

>

>Damn Lurch don't start talking about toys, we're catching shit for having a fucking

>battery or generator !

>Back to the earth man, quick before civilization catches up with us and

>crams comfort down our throats.

>

>You still got yer "Earth" shoes ? I was going to mention my new tractor it's one of

>the hydrostatic drives, electric clutch, pto, ground-engaging, with disk, furrow, and

>60" mower - Big fat tires and everything. I love her, I need her, she's all mine.

 

any more Deep Purple and I'll track you down and kill you. I mean it.

 

lurch

 

 

 

From dallastexas@runningonemptywithoutaclueorasaftey.net Sat Jan 17 11:15:02 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: dallastexas@runningonemptywithoutaclueorasaftey.net

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 19:15:02 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 11:30:59 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

 

>> - Big fat tires and everything. I love her, I need her, she's all mine.

>

>any more Deep Purple and I'll track you down and kill you. I mean it.

 

Fuck me then,

 

I'm sorry, so sorry. I was just a fool - I don't really love her, I don't know how

to love her. I wanna know what love is, I want to know how to find it. I used to

think happiness is a warm gun, I've never felt this way before - I swear it's the

truth.

 

RiM

 

From UnitIV@sputum.com Fri Jan 16 16:18:52 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 00:18:52 GMT

 

Dad sez:

 

}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

 

 

Pammy and Random?

 

Yer on.

 

--

(@ @)\DynaSoar\___, Doktor DynaSoar Iridium, Scienfictiontologist

ll ll Yetii Genetii Research InstiToot, Somedamnwhere, VA

Clench of The One True Pipe Dream, ElectroChurch of the SubGenius

 

From nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com Fri Jan 16 22:15:13 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT

 

UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar) wrote:

 

>Dad sez:

>

>}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>

>

>Pammy and Random?

>

>Yer on.

 

Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

 

It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

difference between luxury and necessity. (This is not aimed at you,

Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

 

When I was in garden school in Santa Cruz we didn't have electricity

at the farm on campus where we lived. It turned out to be one of the

biggest lessons I learned living there: how to be a night creature. I

took long walks at night, stargazed, listened to night sounds. My

eyesight, strained by years of school, returned to 20/20, and I was

able to get rid of my glasses. We lived in tents and teepees (no rain,

no ticks, no chiggers and very few mosquitoes!). By mid-summer most of

us had moved our bedrolls out into the field. I fell asleep in the

grass, with friends snoozing nearby, and woke up with the daylight in

my eyes. We cooked on a gas stove, had a gas refridgerator, cleaned

the kitchen at night by the light of oil lamps. I had no doors, no

locks or keys, very few possessions to possess me.

 

Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

of myself and what my "necessities" are.

 

When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

 

How's that, Dyna?

 

SPOTS--playing piano in the dark sounds cool!

 

From dallastexas@easydaysonmotherearth.net Fri Jan 16 21:08:28 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: dallastexas@easydaysonmotherearth.net

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 05:08:28 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of

the Soil) wrote:

 

>It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

>difference between luxury and necessity.

 

It is amazing, when high summer is eight months long, the humidity can be 0% one day

and 70 the next. The sun is dead straight up for five hours - its really amazing how

anyone decided to settle this fucking area in the first place.

 

WATER COOLERS! First came the water coolers on the roof, through the wall, then came

the people. Luxury or a need to breathe?

 

If you want to test yer metal camp out in old San Antone for a while, the first year

is the one that runs most people back to Nyark.

 

> (This is not aimed at you,

>Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

>So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

>darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

>rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

 

I have to agree with your point - I live miles from the city, and their lights mess

up the sky at night it's just a glow, but still bothersome. The quiet in the

"country" is different than in town.

 

> When I was in garden school in Santa Cruz we didn't have electricity

>at the farm on campus where we lived. It turned out to be one of the

>biggest lessons I learned living there: how to be a night creature. I

>took long walks at night, stargazed, listened to night sounds. My

>eyesight, strained by years of school, returned to 20/20, and I was

>able to get rid of my glasses. We lived in tents and teepees (no rain,

>no ticks, no chiggers and very few mosquitoes!). By mid-summer most of

>us had moved our bedrolls out into the field. I fell asleep in the

>grass, with friends snoozing nearby, and woke up with the daylight in

>my eyes. We cooked on a gas stove, had a gas refridgerator, cleaned

>the kitchen at night by the light of oil lamps. I had no doors, no

>locks or keys, very few possessions to possess me.

 

I was inna the army for a buncha years. We had lots of nights like that, sort of, in

an armyish kind of way. Managed to sleep in the grass a lot of times too, the

unnatural thing was when you got up in the morning - it was still the army.

 

>Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

>occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

>hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

>bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

>the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

>of myself and what my "necessities" are.

 

Yeah its great to know what you really need - far too few of us are able to live with

the minimum - even for the short term. Primitive camping should be an american

pastime.

 

Plumming is easy, just glue pipes together make them go here and there.

Easy instructions too,

Hot goes on the left

Cold goes on the right

Shit runs downhill

If its a trailer the rules work backwards.

 

>When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

>me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

>ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

>I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

>piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

>

>How's that, Dyna?

 

Pretty good from here, but Im not Dyna. I don't think anyone would trade a real

piano for a Clav especially in the dark.

 

Bye

 

RiM

 

From nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com Sat Jan 17 10:52:04 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 18:52:04 GMT

 

dallastexas@easydaysonmotherearth.net wrote:

 

snip

 

>It is amazing, when high summer is eight months long, the humidity can be 0% one day

>and 70 the next. The sun is dead straight up for five hours - its really amazing how

>anyone decided to settle this fucking area in the first place.

 

I am the only person I know who will admit to liking it hot and

humid---the weather, guys, alright?!? Up to about 92 degrees or so I

barely notice it's hot (and in winter I wear five shirts and I'm still

cold--metabolism like a damn hummingbird!)

 

snip

 

>If you want to test yer metal camp out in old San Antone for a while, the first year

>is the one that runs most people back to Nyark.

 

Yeah, I gotta admit I ain't tried desert camping. Dehydration and

hiding under a rock all day with the rattlers sounds like a whole

lotta no fun.

>

snip

 

>I was inna the army for a buncha years. We had lots of nights like that, sort of, in

>an armyish kind of way. Managed to sleep in the grass a lot of times too, the

>unnatural thing was when you got up in the morning - it was still the army.

 

You know, I never once woke up in Santa Cruz and thought, "I wonder if

I'll be shot at today."

>

>>Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

>>occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

>>hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

>>bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

>>the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

>>of myself and what my "necessities" are.

snip

 

>Plumming is easy, just glue pipes together make them go here and there.

>Easy instructions too,

>Hot goes on the left

>Cold goes on the right

>Shit runs downhill

>If its a trailer the rules work backwards.

 

We've done some plumbing, just haven't finished it. We're too busy in

the summer with the gardens, and in winter we're too damn tired from

gardening all the rest of the year! Now we're starting a nursery, so I

guess I'll be washing out of a pot when I'm ninety!

 

SPOTS

 

From cuthulu@prysm.net Sat Jan 17 15:46:27 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: guru cuthulu <cuthulu@prysm.net>

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 17:46:27 -0600

 

Sister Pammy of the Soil wrote:

 

> I am the only person I know who will admit to liking it hot and

> humid---the weather, guys, alright?!? Up to about 92 degrees or so I

> barely notice it's hot (and in winter I wear five shirts and I'm still

> cold--metabolism like a damn hummingbird!)

 

 

I love it here when it is hot. Ninety-eight degrees with a heat index of 115 or

more. That's when I get my best lawn-work done. I put on the wight over the

winter, then by next winter I'm a rail again. It rules.

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sun Jan 18 06:10:37 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 14:10:37 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 18:52:04 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the

Soil) wrote:

 

>dallastexas@easydaysonmotherearth.net wrote:

>

>snip

>

>>It is amazing, when high summer is eight months long, the humidity can be 0% one day

>>and 70 the next. The sun is dead straight up for five hours - its really amazing how

>>anyone decided to settle this fucking area in the first place.

>

>I am the only person I know who will admit to liking it hot and

>humid---the weather, guys, alright?!? Up to about 92 degrees or so I

>barely notice it's hot (and in winter I wear five shirts and I'm still

>cold--metabolism like a damn hummingbird!)

 

I absolutely despise it. If the wife was the same as I was I'd move to Canada so fast I'd

leave a vapor trail. Well, I might need to take my customers along, too. So I'm sorta

stuck in North Georgia, which is not the best place for someone that hates hot weather,

but it least we have a bit of altitude here, so it's no where near as bad as the city is.

Still, I haven't had a coat on all winter (sweatshits a few times), and we adopt what we

call possum hours during the summertime. We start work at about 2:30 or three a.m. and

knock off at noon, to avoid becoming sweat-soaked, sawdust-caked mummies. I have spent the

winter in places where they have hard ones, and the snow and slush and biting wind didn't

bother me anywhere near as much as our insufferable, sticky, buggy, muggy, oppresively hot

summers. Cold weather makes me feel alive. Heat just makes me feel pukey and makes me

lumber around at a tree sloth's pace, grumbling and bitching.

 

On the up side, we do have a nice long growing season, and I get by as long as I do my

gardening and outside type work just after sunup.

 

lurch

 

From UnitIV@sputum.com Fri Jan 16 22:35:23 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:35:23 GMT

 

Sister Pammy of the Soil wrote:

 

}UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar) wrote:

}

}>Dad sez:

}>

}>}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

}>

}>

}>Pammy and Random?

}>

}>Yer on.

}

}Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

}without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

}hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

}wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

 

WOO HOO tell it Sis!

 

}It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

}difference between luxury and necessity. (This is not aimed at you,

}Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

}So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

}darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

}rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

 

NO, hell NO sis. You SAY it.

 

} When I was in garden school in Santa Cruz we didn't have electricity

}at the farm on campus where we lived. It turned out to be one of the

}biggest lessons I learned living there: how to be a night creature. I

}took long walks at night, stargazed, listened to night sounds. My

}eyesight, strained by years of school, returned to 20/20, and I was

}able to get rid of my glasses. We lived in tents and teepees (no rain,

}no ticks, no chiggers and very few mosquitoes!). By mid-summer most of

}us had moved our bedrolls out into the field. I fell asleep in the

}grass, with friends snoozing nearby, and woke up with the daylight in

}my eyes. We cooked on a gas stove, had a gas refridgerator, cleaned

}the kitchen at night by the light of oil lamps. I had no doors, no

}locks or keys, very few possessions to possess me.

 

And thhat's just the START Sister. Tell it ALL.

 

}Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

}occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

}hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

}bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

}the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

}of myself and what my "necessities" are.

 

Get DOWN in that funky water. Get NACH-UR-ALL.

 

}When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

}me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

}ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

}I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

}piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

}

}How's that, Dyna?

}

}SPOTS--playing piano in the dark sounds cool!

 

YEE-HAW it's DAMFINE Sister, you DAMN BETCHA.

 

SO damn fine I cain't even throw in my sour assed cynsicism. Shitchya, it

was damn worth it.

 

Thankee much.

 

(P.S.: Fuck you Dad, you old crank.)

 

--

(@ @)\DynaSoar\___, Doktor DynaSoar Iridium, Scienfictiontologist

ll ll Yetii Genetii Research InstiToot, Somedamnwhere, VA

Clench of The One True Pipe Dream, ElectroChurch of the SubGenius

 

From cmcjp02@nt.com Sat Jan 17 01:09:28 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: "Rev. Random the Other" <cmcjp02@nt.com>

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 04:09:28 -0500

 

Sister Pammy of the Soil wrote:

>

> UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar) wrote:

>

> >Dad sez:

> >

> >}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

> >

> >

> >Pammy and Random?

> >

> >Yer on.

>

> Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

> without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

> hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

> wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

 

 

I sure do miss the wood stove. This is the first winter without it.

Wimpy propane-fired airheater does not begin to create them pure,

radiant Slackwaves roaring off the stove, warming my hands from as

far as 30 feet away. And yes, we're fully wired NOW, but it was a lot

of fun that first year using the backpacking lantern or candles

as a primary source of light, acoustic music only. A few years

of drawing water from a hole in the ground four hundred feet

distant with a five gallon bucket, not having stove or fridge, just

the Hibachi on the porch.

 

Running a sears craftsman 2.5hp pump into that hole got us the luxury

of running water, warm water if the hose was left in the sun. We ran

cold water to the house after another year; STILL don't have hot water

at the faucet, but we now have a gas stovetop to take the place of our

woodstove to heat dishwater, or bathwater if we just don't feel like

a gardenhose shower. Of course, 29 days out of 30 I opt for the

gardenhose shower anyway. I got great pictures of showering outdoors

barefoot in a foot of snow last year at 22 degrees.

 

When hurricane Hugo blew through it was a call from my friend Gregory

in California that alerted us several days after the fact. The call

was surreal: "No, I hadn't noticed....You're RIGHT, the electricity is

off!...Four days ago?....Well that explains why the peach tree fell

over...Err, no, we don't own a TV or a radio..."

We were without electricity for four days and hadn't noticed.

 

> It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

> difference between luxury and necessity. (This is not aimed at you,

> Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

> So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

> darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

> rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

 

 

 

It surprises me not at all that people lose their perspective, with

the CONspiracy ever at work to convince people that they need

climate controlled homes, offices, and automobiles. The CON has got

this battle all but won, judging from how often I hear "Oh, I

couldn't LIVE without my TV". But the CON is insidious; it not only

fuels a sense of superiority in those who have the latest technology

(that's why the commercials often focus on self-esteem issues, on why

your life is lacking and how their product will make YOU a better

person) but provides the BLINDERS to keep you from recognising that

Slack that's all around you. The Slack that perhaps those other

people are soaking up. You're handed the easy comparisons and the

easy labels for those people and their ways. It is not a matter of

one ideological stance vs. another but of AWARENESS vs. AUTOMATION.

The CON tells you that it's safer with street lights, but doesn't

mention the Slack in walking out to the compost pile on a dark night,

unable to see six inches in front of yourself. The CON tells you to

come in out of the cold, but what about those weirdos in Cedar Grove

ROLLING NAKED IN THE SNOW? (Really gonna miss that woodstove this

year.)

 

 

I have no issue with those who do not WANT to roll naked in the snow;

what I have as a target here is how EASY the CON has made it to label

those po'buckras like Pammy and me so as to create a false sense of

assurance that we are MISSING OUT somehow. The words used are

usually full of negative connotation: Anti-technology, Natureburgers,

Hippies, revivalists, survivalists, sun worshipers, nutcases, kooks.

The CON wants you to do be happy, their way. It never mentions that

people living unconventionally often are doing it for Slack, that the

Slack of rolling naked in the snow is a far better thing than the

numb conformity of not wanting to upset the neighbors and so staying

indoors.

 

Ted Kaczynski mails a few bombs and is considered a dangerous

criminal; the fact that he lives without electricity or plumbing

makes him CRAZY. Hell, HE has REAL WOOD paneling, and while his

restroom facility is also a hole in the ground outside, it is MORE

CONVIENIENTLY SITUATED near the house. I don't see broken glass

panes or squirrel holes. HIS fire-pit is nicely stone-lined. I get

real nervous that the CON has decided he is crazy based on THAT place;

our place makes his look upscale. He doesn't even sleep in a

bed, just on a wood slab. Uh oh.(That's right, no matress/boxsprings)

 

The CONspiracy supplies all the illusions needed to keep subjugation

up to date. People who care about what everyone else thinks often

NEED to think that there IS NO SLACK, oh no, just being happy and

getting along is enough. If we ALL simply got along, look the same,

act the same, ARE the same...

 

It is easier for the CON to ignore them wierdos in Cedar Grove who

purposely created an immediate environment filled with scents and

colors of innumerable flowers (why should anyone want to work that

hard?), who play music (why so LOUD?), who roll in the snow (they'll

catch their death a cold!) and walk in the woods and play with the

snakes (it's dangerous!). But if it just can't ignore them wierdos,

it at least can label them as ANYTHING but Slackful, anything that

keeps one from thinking that one may have something in common with

'em, that keeps the focus on salient differences and keeps the focus

away from the possibility that the CON programming is not sufficient

to a satisfying life. As long as they keep spoon-feeding you the

Options, they keep you from noticing the Slack that's YOURS for the

taking; as long as they make ridicule an unquestioned response to

unconventionality, they make it unlikely that you will value

self-expression in yourself or in others.

 

 

 

 

> When I was in garden school in Santa Cruz we didn't have electricity

> at the farm on campus where we lived. It turned out to be one of the

> biggest lessons I learned living there: how to be a night creature. I

> took long walks at night, stargazed, listened to night sounds. My

> eyesight, strained by years of school, returned to 20/20, and I was

> able to get rid of my glasses. We lived in tents and teepees (no rain,

> no ticks, no chiggers and very few mosquitoes!). By mid-summer most of

> us had moved our bedrolls out into the field. I fell asleep in the

> grass, with friends snoozing nearby, and woke up with the daylight in

> my eyes. We cooked on a gas stove, had a gas refridgerator, cleaned

> the kitchen at night by the light of oil lamps. I had no doors, no

> locks or keys, very few possessions to possess me.

>

> Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

> occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

> hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

> bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

> the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

> of myself and what my "necessities" are.

 

 

Hee Hee - we built the "bathroom" as an addition onto the back porch

because a friend let us have a 5'x9' window and we really wanted that

window. Years of hauling water by the bucket (remember watering the

garden with rainwater off the roof?) have me still smiling at the

"luxury" whenever I turn on a spigot.

 

>

> When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

> me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

> ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

> I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

> piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

>

> How's that, Dyna?

>

> SPOTS--playing piano in the dark sounds cool!

 

 

Rev. Random the Other

Gription Mud Clench

"isn't it time YOU rolled naked in the snow?"

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sat Jan 17 05:29:55 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 13:29:55 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com

(Sister Pammy of the Soil) wrote:

 

>UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar) wrote:

>

>>Dad sez:

>>

>>}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>>

>>

>>Pammy and Random?

>>

>>Yer on.

>

>Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

>without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

>hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

>wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

 

I still heat my shop with wood. Gotta do something with all the scrap.

Makes more sense to burn it than to pay to have it hauled off

 

 

>It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

>difference between luxury and necessity. (This is not aimed at you,

>Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

>So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

>darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

>rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

 

Yeah, I feel the same way, sorta. I just have to be able to run my

tools and such. People needing fixtures for a grand opening or

something aren't very understanding if you tell them you won't have

their stuff when you said you would because you got no power. In fact,

the one time I did, the guy said "Why don't you have a generator, you

asshole?" Didn't have a real good answer to that, so I got one.

 

But at the same time, I like either to have a lot of functioning

conveniences or absolutely nothing. I'll go out in the woods in the

wintertime and sleep in a debris hut for a week, but when I get back

it will piss me off if the Cuisinart malfunctions. I only like

roughing it when I get something out of it. Nothing to be gained by

hanging around a house fulla junk that don't work, at least for me.

 

>some snips>

 

>Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

>occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

>hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

>bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

>the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

>of myself and what my "necessities" are.

 

Okay. You win. I can't go that far. I gotta admit I like plumbing. No

matter where I was or what situation I was in (if I was gonna be there

any length of time) I'd try to rig something up, even if it was just a

bunch of rainfall cisterns and gravity-fed punched bamboo and pitch

piping or something. I understand how a measure of self-imposed

ascetism can make for a simpler, better and less stressful life, but

it just seems a lot of normally quick and easy tasks can become kinda

pointlesly time consuming if the position of the line between "wants"

and "needs" is not affected by some concessions to convenience.

 

I do business with a lot of Amish guys, and stayed with one for a

while when I was learning to steam-bend wood, and have seen first hand

how hard they are having to struggle to hold on to the best aspects of

their lifestyle, (which, I'll admit, goony religion aside, beats the

shit out of our ant-like consumerist frenzy) while allowing a

reasonable level of practicality, but for the most part, I think they

are pulling it off. But when faced with reducing the width of a rock

maple plank a half inch along it's entire length, it's hard for them

(and me) to justify dragging out granpappy's razor-sharp jointer plane

and spending an hour pushing it along the board in long,

soul-satisfying strokes, glorying in the aromatic shavings that litter

the workshop floor and the bench, instead of poking it through a

tablesaw. So they don't. They got lots of power tools. Me too. I think

it's okay to use the things that can make your life easier, as long

as you aren't ruled by them, and thier attainment doesn't become an

end in itself.

 

Not having TV's makes sense. So does not having cars (as long as you

can mooch one off a Mennonite when you really need one). It's nice to

have a horse that knows the way home when you are too shitfaced to

find the way yourself, anyway. Not having a phone is kinda dumb in

this day and age (and a lot of them have them. they just hide them in

outhouses and woodsheds so they don't catch any crap from the bishop).

But living close to the land, maintaining a reverence for it, looking

out for each other, enjoying fellowship and fresh air (even when

discreetly scented by the midsummer dispersal of pigshit), and

maintaining at least the capability for self-sufficiency are certainly

sensible practices, and it's depressing that the majority of us have

lost sight of the worth of them. But I don't think that availing

oneself of conveniences neccessarily precludes an appreciation of that

sort of lifestyle. I hope not. I can't cause something to be

uninvented by not using it. I know that much. May all be just

rationalization, but I think perception, and the way and to what a

person assigns value is more important than the way he or she manages

to get it into his or her life.

 

>When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

>me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

>ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

>I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

>piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

 

Well, you could rig up a pigpoop generator. Maybe do some small scale

hydroelectric stuff if you have a creek, or make a windmill that spins

an old alternator, store the current in car batteries and invert it.

But just blowing it off and keeping the piano is okay, too, I guess.

It's just so much fun to fritter with stuff. I dunno. Harmonicas are

good, too. And they don't need no jiuce either and they'll fit in your

pocket. But I can't play them and they got no moving PARTS so I don't

wanna mess with them. HONK.

 

I want some bagpipes. Do they make electric ones? With a fuzz pedal,

maybe? I could get one of them big foam-rubber cowboy hats and cover

it with solar panels and run 'em offa that and stand around in the sun

making distorted hogs-being-slaughtered noises during hangover hours

and pissing off all the neighbors till they start braying and throwing

their pitiful little phone books and threatening to pee thru the fence

and asking me if I don't at least know some REAL songs like countin'

flowers on the wall or something and I'd toot and BLAAAAAH!!! at 'em

and say fuck no!, cause I know I'd be to lazy to really learn how to

play the dam things. Har Har. That'd be a big hoot. Yep.

 

 

lurch

 

From user@domain.demon.co.uk Sat Jan 17 12:29:01 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: user@domain.demon.co.uk (dode)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 20:29:01 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 13:29:55 GMT, snorts@erratix..com

(RevLurch) wrote:

 

>

> I still heat my shop with wood. Gotta do something with all the scrap.

> Makes more sense to burn it than to pay to have it hauled off

>

 

My heating packed up just before christmas, I would sell my

soul (any offers, one careless owner limited karma warranty)

for a solid fuel stove and an open chimneys.

 

>

> Well, you could rig up a pigpoop generator. Maybe do some small scale

> hydroelectric stuff if you have a creek, or make a windmill that spins

> an old alternator, store the current in car batteries and invert it.

 

I lived a pretty idyllic island childhood for a time, no

electricity, no hot water, doing without all those things

that business men pay a fortune to do without on team

building courses. One old geezer had a nice windmill that he

used to charge car batteries, he had to collect his water

from a well, the weather blew straight through his house but

the old bastard always kept the windmill in good order all

he powered off it was an old black and white TV.

 

> I want some bagpipes. Do they make electric ones? With a fuzz pedal,

> maybe?

 

They do make electric bagpipes but only for old windbags who

can't blow hard enough to fill the wee tartan bag (I am sure

that it was originally part of a sheep). I haven't seen one

with a fuzz pedal though, I'm not sure you could

realistically expect to distort the sound of the bagpipes

and survive.

 

> I could get one of them big foam-rubber cowboy hats and cover

> it with solar panels and run 'em offa that and stand around in the sun

> making distorted hogs-being-slaughtered noises during hangover hours

> and pissing off all the neighbors till they start braying and throwing

> their pitiful little phone books and threatening to pee thru the fence

> and asking me if I don't at least know some REAL songs like countin'

> flowers on the wall or something and I'd toot and BLAAAAAH!!! at 'em

> and say fuck no!, cause I know I'd be to lazy to really learn how to

> play the dam things. Har Har. That'd be a big hoot. Yep.

>

 

I don't know what scares me more the bagpipes or the idea of

you in a solar powered cowboy hat. As for learning to play

the bagpipes don't worry about it. No one really plays them

they just skirl and whine out white noise, the audience only

hear what they expect to.

 

Doh'd

 

For email, user = dode, domain = dolmen.

homepage = http://www.dolmen.demon.co.uk

 

 

From nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com Sat Jan 17 23:41:14 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the Soil)

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 07:41:14 GMT

 

snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

 

>On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com

>(Sister Pammy of the Soil) wrote:

>

>>UnitIV@sputum.com (Doktor DynaSoar) wrote:

>>

>>>Dad sez:

>>>

>>>}>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>>>

>>>

>>>Pammy and Random?

>>>

>>>Yer on.

>>

>>Seven days without electricity? Seven days? How about thirteen years

>>without indoor plumbing? Twelve years of heating with wood (until I

>>hurt my back and couldn't carry wood for awhile). But we're fully

>>wired, so we can make the loud music, you know?

>

>I still heat my shop with wood. Gotta do something with all the scrap.

>Makes more sense to burn it than to pay to have it hauled off

>

>

>>It does amaze me how people lose their sense of perspective about the

>>difference between luxury and necessity. (This is not aimed at you,

>>Dad. Maine in winter probably has a big three hours of sunlight. Ugh.)

>>So which is the most necessary: electricity, or being able to enjoy

>>darkness at night, seeing stars instead of streetlights? Do I need my

>>rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

>

>Yeah, I feel the same way, sorta. I just have to be able to run my

>tools and such. People needing fixtures for a grand opening or

>something aren't very understanding if you tell them you won't have

>their stuff when you said you would because you got no power. In fact,

>the one time I did, the guy said "Why don't you have a generator, you

>asshole?" Didn't have a real good answer to that, so I got one.

>

>But at the same time, I like either to have a lot of functioning

>conveniences or absolutely nothing. I'll go out in the woods in the

>wintertime and sleep in a debris hut for a week, but when I get back

>it will piss me off if the Cuisinart malfunctions. I only like

>roughing it when I get something out of it. Nothing to be gained by

>hanging around a house fulla junk that don't work, at least for me.

>

>>some snips>

>

>>Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

>>occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

>>hose work for much of the year, and for the rest we do actually have a

>>bathroom and tub. I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

>>the tub. Easy. I feel richer, safer, and saner for knowing the measure

>>of myself and what my "necessities" are.

>

>Okay. You win. I can't go that far. I gotta admit I like plumbing. No

>matter where I was or what situation I was in (if I was gonna be there

>any length of time) I'd try to rig something up, even if it was just a

>bunch of rainfall cisterns and gravity-fed punched bamboo and pitch

>piping or something. I understand how a measure of self-imposed

>ascetism can make for a simpler, better and less stressful life, but

>it just seems a lot of normally quick and easy tasks can become kinda

>pointlesly time consuming if the position of the line between "wants"

>and "needs" is not affected by some concessions to convenience.

 

 

You are probably alot more patient with construction than I am. I love

hard work, like gardening, but anything that involves alot of right

angles drives me over the bend pretty fast.

 

I love convenience, too. It's just that I dug myself in pretty deep

with the garden. Do you know that feeling of having so much work to do

that, if you could stop and set up the conveniences, it would be

easier, but meanwhile there's too much work to do to take time out for

side projects, even really useful ones? That's where I was when I hurt

my back, loving my work but a bit overwhelmed. This recovery period

has been a useful evaluation time. When i get back to gardening I want

to make it easier!

 

>I do business with a lot of Amish guys, and stayed with one for a

>while when I was learning to steam-bend wood, and have seen first hand

>how hard they are having to struggle to hold on to the best aspects of

>their lifestyle, (which, I'll admit, goony religion aside, beats the

>shit out of our ant-like consumerist frenzy) while allowing a

>reasonable level of practicality, but for the most part, I think they

>are pulling it off. But when faced with reducing the width of a rock

>maple plank a half inch along it's entire length, it's hard for them

>(and me) to justify dragging out granpappy's razor-sharp jointer plane

>and spending an hour pushing it along the board in long,

>soul-satisfying strokes, glorying in the aromatic shavings that litter

>the workshop floor and the bench, instead of poking it through a

>tablesaw. So they don't. They got lots of power tools. Me too. I think

>it's okay to use the things that can make your life easier, as long

>as you aren't ruled by them, and thier attainment doesn't become an

>end in itself.

>

>Not having TV's makes sense. So does not having cars (as long as you

>can mooch one off a Mennonite when you really need one). It's nice to

>have a horse that knows the way home when you are too shitfaced to

>find the way yourself, anyway.

Do the Amish get shitfaced, really? My mom's Pa Dutch, so I've spent

alot of time up there. I sure admire the Mennonites I've met up there

for the good, hard work they do. It's not just the Amish and

Mennonites, though. My relatives still on the farm have a notion of a

good day's work that involves doing a good job, finishing it, cleaning

up their mess, and still being in the door at five o'clock for a hot

supper. They work hard.

 

Not having a phone is kinda dumb in

>this day and age (and a lot of them have them. they just hide them in

>outhouses and woodsheds so they don't catch any crap from the bishop).

>But living close to the land, maintaining a reverence for it, looking

>out for each other, enjoying fellowship and fresh air (even when

>discreetly scented by the midsummer dispersal of pigshit), and

>maintaining at least the capability for self-sufficiency are certainly

>sensible practices, and it's depressing that the majority of us have

>lost sight of the worth of them. But I don't think that availing

>oneself of conveniences neccessarily precludes an appreciation of that

>sort of lifestyle. I hope not. I can't cause something to be

>uninvented by not using it. I know that much. May all be just

>rationalization, but I think perception, and the way and to what a

>person assigns value is more important than the way he or she manages

>to get it into his or her life.

 

Good stuff, Lurch. Thanks.

 

 

SPOTS

"What we need, what we all need...money!"--Fetchin Bones

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sun Jan 18 02:34:57 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 10:34:57 GMT

 

On Sun, 18 Jan 1998 07:41:14 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com (Sister Pammy of the

Soil) wrote:

 

>snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch) wrote:

>

>>On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com

>>(Sister Pammy of the Soil) wrote:

>>

>ascetism can make for a simpler, better and less stressful life, but

>>it just seems a lot of normally quick and easy tasks can become kinda

>>pointlesly time consuming if the position of the line between "wants"

>>and "needs" is not affected by some concessions to convenience.

>

>

>You are probably alot more patient with construction than I am. I love

>hard work, like gardening, but anything that involves alot of right

>angles drives me over the bend pretty fast.

 

I like rigging stuff up. Sometimes it even works when I get done

 

>I love convenience, too. It's just that I dug myself in pretty deep

>with the garden. Do you know that feeling of having so much work to do

>that, if you could stop and set up the conveniences, it would be

>easier, but meanwhile there's too much work to do to take time out for

>side projects, even really useful ones?

 

yeah. Woodwormers call that being too busy using the blades to sharpen them.

 

>That's where I was when I hurt

>my back, loving my work but a bit overwhelmed. This recovery period

>has been a useful evaluation time. When i get back to gardening I want

>to make it easier!

 

Yeah. I like to get the most stuff for the least effort. I'm more concerned with yield

than looks. I'd be in good shape if it weren't for the stinking trumpet vines that grow

two feet a day and grow back no matter how many times your rip them out by the roots.

 

Tractors are nice, but if your area is like mine, you probably can find someone to come

over once in a while and do what you need done. Getting yer teeth rattled out with a

rented roto-tiller is the shits.

 

 

>can mooch one off a Mennonite when you really need one). It's nice to

>>have a horse that knows the way home when you are too shitfaced to

>>find the way yourself, anyway.

 

>Do the Amish get shitfaced, really? My mom's Pa Dutch, so I've spent

>alot of time up there.

 

Yeah. I dunno if the religion prohibits it or not, but the guy I worked with liked a good

sized nip (or two) after a long day of bending wheel rims and pitching Percheron poop, and

I didn't get the impression he was the only one.

 

>I sure admire the Mennonites I've met up there

>for the good, hard work they do. It's not just the Amish and

>Mennonites, though. My relatives still on the farm have a notion of a

>good day's work that involves doing a good job, finishing it, cleaning

>up their mess, and still being in the door at five o'clock for a hot

>supper. They work hard.

 

Yeah. They do. I've really only I've crossed paths with them because they are about the

only people that make parts for buggy wheels. They know a lot about drying, choosing, and

working with wood, and their houses and barns don't blow down in a breath of wind like

the popsicle stick sapwood stud and oriented strand board sixteen penny formaldehyde

fuming chambers English builders toss up.

 

I still have never figured out why all the men have beards but none of them have

moustaches, though. Or why the women are usually half again as big as the men they are

married to. I was afraid to ask that stuff was rooted in religion as well.

 

 

>>rationalization, but I think perception, and the way and to what a

>>person assigns value is more important than the way he or she manages

>>to get it into his or her life.

>

>Good stuff, Lurch. Thanks.

 

really? Thank you. At least for not pointing out it was perhaps a tad fatuous and

long-winded, which it seemed to be to me, when I re-read it after getting my blood

caffiene up to normal operating levels.

 

live it up!

 

lurch

 

 

From fake@email.address.mil Sat Jan 17 06:39:37 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: fake@email.address.mil (Rev. Matthew A. Carey)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 14:39:37 GMT

 

On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 06:15:13 GMT, nojunkmailtoxiccow@mindspring.com

(Sister Pammy of the Soil) wrote:

> Do I need my

>rock and roll more than my earthy peace and quiet?

>

> When I was in garden school in Santa Cruz we didn't have electricity

>at the farm on campus where we lived.

> We lived in tents and teepees

>. By mid-summer most of

>us had moved our bedrolls out into the field. I fell asleep in the

>grass, with friends snoozing nearby,

> I had no doors, no

>locks or keys, very few possessions to possess me.

>

>Here at our farm Random and I could install plumbing, in fact we

>occasionally talk about the idea. But outdoor showers with the garden

>hose work for much of the year,

> I just heat a kettle of water and take a "shower" in

>the tub.

 

 

 

Fine more emfs and meat food product for me.

 

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Strange new text files at: http://www.humboldt1.com/~carey/text/

New cassette list at: http://www.humboldt1.com/~carey/tapes/

 

email is: carey(at)humboldt1.com

 

postal is: Matthew Carey

PO Box 594

Arcata, CA 95518

 

From charliec@cybernex.net Sat Jan 17 19:02:24 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: TheCharlie <charliec@cybernex.net>

Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 03:02:24 GMT

 

Sister Pammy of the Soil wrote:

>

> When I went shopping a few years ago for a piano, the saleman showed

> me the Yamaha Clavinova. Digitally sampled grand piano sound, plus a

> ton of goodies like drums and stuff I could trigger. What a play toy!

> I left to think about it for awhile, but when I came back I bought the

> piano. I can play it even when the electricity goes out.

 

I went with the clavinova.. but didn't bother with the 'goodies'

cause I don't like most of them. (mostly wanted the grand piano

sounds and the Rhodes) I like it cause I can play it at ANY time

without bothering anyone.. even in the same room)

 

> SPOTS--playing piano in the dark sounds cool!

 

best way.. no visual distractions

 

From seester@earthling.net Fri Jan 16 15:25:54 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: seester@earthling.net (Seester Rosa Gabriel)

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 23:25:54 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 17:57:17 GMT, snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

wrote:

 

>On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 06:08:47 -0500, mtownOsPAMend@earthlink.net

>(Michael Townsend) wrote:

>

>>YOU try going 7 days without it.

>

>I went longer than that a few years back, but I had an 2500 watt

>inverter and a bunch of car batteries. I have a big propane generator

>wired directly to the bus bars in my power box now, as well as a

>shitload of unwanted company whenever we have an outage, which we do,

>pretty often. I wish I'd never told anybody about it. When the juice

>goes out now, my scuzzy neighbors come rooting and snorfling and

>dropping broad hints and I'm usually not mean enough to send their

>sorry, unprepared asses back to their dark, cold shacks to jones over

>the sitcoms they can't watch.

 

Lurch, I'm shocked! I expected a story of buckshot and flamethrowing

as the city ants begged for your country ant salvation. Not even

*ONE* hound was released upon them? They got you now, Son.

Next time you need that End Times Condo they will already be there,

using your re-usable toilet paper and sending FEMA taxi's and pizza's

from your satellite communications etch-a-sketch. You'll be lucky if

they let you have a korner to nibble your dehydrated lamb shank.

You got to go over there right now and shoot 'em all in the head,

arrange them in a circle and point the evidence at the youngest boy.

I've come to know and love you as a Survivalist not a bleeding heart

socialist. Take back your power Underground Homeboy!

 

Seester Rosa

******************

http://exo.com/~area27/

 

 

 

 

 

 

From snorts@erratix..com Sat Jan 17 06:03:28 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: snorts@erratix..com (RevLurch)

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 14:03:28 GMT

 

On Fri, 16 Jan 1998 23:25:54 GMT, seester@earthling.net (Seester Rosa

Gabriel) wrote:

 

>>goes out now, my scuzzy neighbors come rooting and snorfling and

>>dropping broad hints and I'm usually not mean enough to send their

>>sorry, unprepared asses back to their dark, cold shacks to jones over

>>the sitcoms they can't watch.

>

>Lurch, I'm shocked! I expected a story of buckshot and flamethrowing

>as the city ants begged for your country ant salvation. Not even

>*ONE* hound was released upon them?

 

In the midst of a hound shortage here. They wanted some grits, and I

gave 'em some. They had bugs in 'em, and I didn't tell 'em. Does that

count?

 

 

> They got you now, Son.

>Next time you need that End Times Condo they will already be there,

>using your re-usable toilet paper and sending FEMA taxi's and pizza's

>from your satellite communications etch-a-sketch.

 

 

>You'll be lucky if

>they let you have a korner to nibble your dehydrated lamb shank.

>You got to go over there right now and shoot 'em all in the head,

>arrange them in a circle and point the evidence at the youngest boy.

>I've come to know and love you as a Survivalist not a bleeding heart

>socialist. Take back your power Underground Homeboy!

 

 

Hey, as soon as congres starts meeting in Diego Garcia and the

National Guard goes on a national Food Giant-looting spree, I'll

re-attach all the fishing line trips and bait the Malay Man-Traps with

Mars Bars and nudie books.

 

 

lurch

 

 

From felixxx@goodnet.com Sat Jan 17 17:06:54 1998

Newsgroups: alt.slack

Subject: Re: electricity

From: "Elvis J.R." <felixxx@goodnet.com>

Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 18:06:54 -0700

 

Michael Townsend wrote:

 

> YOU try going 7 days without it.

 

I'm now in sunny Phoenix, Arizona! And it sucks to be YOU! :)

 

--

Elvis J.R. current teenIdol of the &#696; cAbAl

home of darkElves, piXies, and other sillyBeasts.