Trees of Alabama
State Tree - The Longleaf Pine

Forest Ecosystem Books (in association with Amazon.com)
If you can't find your tree, try this list.

Plant Fact Sheets Society of American Foresters
Southern Research Station (Forestry research papers) The Morton Arboretum
U.S. Endangered/Threatened Species List pH of Freshly Fallen Leaves
Landscaping for Wildlife Plant of the month wallpaper
Auburn University's Herbarium  

Pine Trees

Eastern White Pine
Pinus strobus

(pics)
Other Common Names White pine, Northern white pine, Northern pine, Weymouth pine, Soft pine, American white pine, American yellow pine, Apple pine, Balsam pine, Cork pine, Pumpkin pine, Sapling pine, Silver pine, Spruce pine.
Benefits to wildlife Food: Cones (seeds) are eaten by the yellow-bellied sapsucker, pine siskin, pine warbler, red crossbill and red squirrels. Beavers, porcupines, white-tailed deer, and snowshoe hares also eat the seeds, bark and foilage.
Habitat: Bald eagles prefer the white pine tree for nesting sites.
Other Links Tech Sheet
USGS Climate-Vegetation Atlas (pdf format)
UConn Plant Database data
Info from Ohio Division of Forestry
Nurseries selling white pines
Sand Pine (pics)
Pinus clausa

Not native to Alabama
Other Common Names Scrub pine, Spruce pine, Ocala sand pine, Choctawhatchee sand pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by small birds and mammals like wild turkey, bobwhite quail, fox squirrel, gray squirrel, and mourning dove.
Habitat: The canopy is used by woodpeckers, songbirds, and birds of prey, as well as grey and flying squirrels. The Florida Scrub Jay (endangered) also nests in these trees.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Info from NCSU
Fire Effects Information
Loblolly Pine (pics)
Pinus taeda

Books on Loblolly pine at Amazon.com
Other Common Names Oldfield pine, North Carolina pine, Arkansas soft pine, Shortleaf pine, Shortstraw pine, Yellow pine.
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by songbirds and small mammals.
Habitat: White-tailed deer, gray squirrel, fox squirrel, bobwhite quail, and wild turkey use the loblolly for shelter. The red-cockaded woodpeckers, pine warbler, brown-headed nuthatch, and Bachman's warbler use the loblolly for shelter and nest sites. Cavities in standing dead trees are used as nests for woodpeckers. The ospreys and the bald eagle also use the loblolly for nesting.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Short Description of the Loblolly
Nurseries that sell Loblolly Pine
Longleaf Pine (pics)
Pinus palustris
Other Common Names Longstraw, Yellow, Southern yellow, Swamp, Hard or Heart, Pitch, and Georgia pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by bobwhite, mourning dove and other small birds and animals. Squirrels will eat the seeds before they ripen.
Habitat: The longleaf pine is the primary habitat for the red-cockaded woodpecker. The Gopher tortoise and Sherman's fox squirrel are part of the longleaf's ecosystem.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Short description of the Longleaf Pine tree
More information with images
Nurseries that sell Loblolly Pine
Short history of the Heart pine
Jack Pine (pics)
Pinus banksiana

Not native to Alabama
Other Common Names Scrub, Banksian, or Hudson Bay pine
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links  
Shortleaf Pine (pics)
Pinus echinata
Other Common Names Shortleaf yellow, Southern yellow, Oldfield, Shortstraw, or Arkansas soft pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by small birds and mammals. Deer eat seedlings.
Habitat: Wild turkey and bobwhite quail use the cover of the shortleaf. The red-cackaded woodpecker use cavities in these trees for shelter and nesting.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with pics
Images from the Noble Foundation gallery
Slash Pine (pics)
Pinus elliottii
Other Common Names Southern pine, Yellow slash pine, Swamp pine, Pitch pine, and Cuban pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by small birds and mammals. Deer eat seedlings.
Habitat: The red-cackaded woodpecker use cavities in these trees for shelter and nesting.
Other Links Introductory Information
Planting Information
Fact Sheet with cone and bark pics
Information from Purdue University
Slash Pine Plantation in FL
Spruce Pine (pics)
Pinus glabra
Other Common Names Cedar pine, Walter pine, or Bottom white pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: Seeds are eaten by Northern bobwhite and squirrels.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with pics
Table Mountain Pine (pics)
Pinus pungens

Not native to Alabama
Other Common Names Hickory pine, Mountain pine, Prickly pine, Squirrel pine.
Benefits to wildlife Food: Red squirrels eat the seeds.
Habitat:
Other Links Description
Red Pine (pics)
Pinus resinosa

Not native to Alabama
Other Common Names Norway pine, Hard pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: White-tailed deer and snow-shoe hares eat the saplings. Red squirrels, chipmunks, mice, red crossbills, pine grosbeaks, and pine siskins eat the seeds.
Habitat:
Other Links  
Pitch Pine (pics)
Pinus rigida

Not native to Alabama
Other Common Names Southern pine, Black pine, Torch pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: Deer, cottontail rabbits, and meadow mice eat the sprouts and seedlings. Red squirrels, quail, chickadees, juncos, and mice eat the seeds.
Habitat:
Other Links  
Pond Pine (pics)
Pinus serotina
Other Common Names Marsh pine, Pocosin pine, Bay pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: Deer eat on the sprouts and seedlings. Birds and rodents eat the seeds.
Habitat: Pond pine stands provide nesting for the red-cockaded woodpeckers and also provide for many wetland species.
Other Links Fact sheet with pics
USDA Forest Service
FEIS Information
Virginia Pine (pics)
Pinus virginiana
Other Common Names Jersey pine, Scrub pine, Spruce pine, Poverty Pine
Benefits to wildlife Food: Deer browse the seedlings. Many songbirds and small mammals eat the seeds.
Habitat: Old and decaying trees are a favorite nesting sites for woodpeckers. Also serves as habitat for pine siskins and pine grosbeaks.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with pics
Wood characteristics
Caring for the Virginia pine
FEIS Database

Hemlock Trees

Eastern Hemlock (pics) and more images
Tsuga canadensis
Other Common Names Hemlock, Canadian Hemlock
Benefits to wildlife Food: Yellow-bellied sapsucker
Habitat: Hemlock forests create streams that are more suitable for aquatic invertebrates.
Other Links Growing eastern hemlocks
Description of
Hemlock forest ecology

Cypress Trees

Baldcypress (pics)

Taxodium distichum
Other Common Names Cypress, Southern -cypress, Swamp-cypress, Red-cypress, Yellow-cypress, White-cypress, Tidewater red-cypress, or Gulf-cypress
Benefits to wildlife Food: Baldcypress seeds are eaten by wild turkeys, squirrels, evening grosbeaks, and wood ducks; they are a minor part of the diet of other waterfowl and wading birds; and they were an important food for the now-extinct Carolina parakeet. Yellow-throated warblers forage in the Spanish moss or resurrection fern (Polypodium polypodioides) often found on old trees.
Habitat: Large old baldcypress furnish unique habitats for some wildlife. Bald eagles and ospreys nest in the tops. Prothonotary warblers achieve their highest densities in baldcypress-tupelo stands where they find nesting cavities in old decaying baldcypress knees. Catfish spawn in submerged hollow cypress logs.
Other Links UDSA Forest Service
Fact sheet with pics


Cedar Trees

Atlantic White Cedar (pic)

Chamaecyparis thyoides
Other Common Names Southern white-cedar, White cedar, False cypress, Swamp cedar
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with pics
Eastern Red Cedar (pic) more images

Juniperus virginiana
Other Common Names Red juniper, Red cedar, Savin, Cedar, Juniper bush
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with pics
Purdue University information


Cottonwood Trees

Eastern Cottonwood (pics): tree leaves fruit

Populus deltoides
Other Common Names Eastern poplar, Cottonwood, Carolina poplar, Whitewood
Benefits to wildlife Food: Rodents and small mammals eat the seedlings and saplings.
Habitat: Beavers use the wood for dams and lodges.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with images
FEIS database
Swamp Cottonwood (pics)

Populus heterophylla
Other Common Names Swamp poplar, Cottonwood, Black cottonwood, River cottonwood
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with images


Willow Trees

Black Willow (pics)

Salix nigra
Other Common Names Swamp willow, Crack willow
Benefits to wildlife Food: The buds and flowering catkins are eaten by birds. The twigs and leaves are eaten by deer. Rodents eat the bark and buds. An early source of nectar for insects.
Habitat: Some small birds use the trees for nesting sites.
Other Links Ohio Forestry Description
DCNR Description
FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Medical uses
USDA Forest Service


Hickory Trees

Water Hickory Images:
Bark and Nuts

Carya aquatica
Other Common Names Swamp hickory, Bitter pecan, Pignut hickory
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are eaten by many birds. Wood ducks, squirrels, and other small mammals eat the nuts.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet from the National PLANTS database
Description with images
Bitternut Hickory Images

Carya cordiformis
Other Common Names Swamp hickory, Pig hickory, Pignut, Bitter pecan tree, Bitter pignut, White hickory, Red-heart hickory, Yellowbud hickory
Benefits to wildlife Food: As with all hickory nuts, they are an important source of food for squirrels and other wildlife. However, since the nuts are bitter, they are generally not a first choice for squirrels. Beavers, rabbits and small rodents may sometimes eat the tree bark.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Description and distribution in Oklahoma
Fact sheet with images
Ohio Division of Forestry description
FEIS Database
Pignut Hickory (pics)
Carya glabra
Other Common Names Bitternut, Black hickory, Brown hickory, Red hickory
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are eaten by squirrels. Nuts and flowers are eaten by wild turkeys and birds.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Short description with images
Shellbark Hickory (images)

Carya laciniosa

Search for Carya laciniosa on Dogpile
Other Common Names Bigleaf shagbark hickory, Big shellbark, Kingnut
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are largely eaten by squirrels and chipmunks and to a lesser degree by black bears, gray and red foxes, rabbits, and white-footed mice plus bird species such as mallards, wood ducks, bobwhites, and wild turkey.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Physical description
OPLIN Description
Fact sheet with images
Buy this tree at NADF
Nutmeg Hickory (pics)

Carya myristicaeformis

The Nutmeg Hickory is on the NC threatened plants list.
Other Common Names Bitter water hickory, Swamp hickory, Pecan
Benefits to wildlife Food: Squirrels and other small rodents eat the nuts.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Description at GardenBed.com
Shagbark Hickory (images)

Carya ovata
Other Common Names Carolina hickory, Scalybark hickory, Shellbark hickory
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are largely eaten by squirrels and chipmunks and to a lesser degree by black bears, gray and red foxes, rabbits, and white-footed mice plus bird species such as mallards, wood ducks, bobwhites, and wild turkey.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
Fact sheet with images
Mockernut Hickory (images)
Carya tomentosa
Other Common Names Whiteheart hickory, Bullnut, White hickory, Hognut
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are largely eaten by squirrels and chipmunks and to a lesser degree by black bears, gray and red foxes, rabbits, and white-footed mice plus bird species such as mallards, wood ducks, quail, and wild turkey. Deer sometimes browse the leaves, twigs and nuts.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Texas A&M Univ. Description
NC State Univ. Description
Virginia Tech. Fact Sheet

Birch Trees

Sweet Birch images

Betula lenta
Other Common Names Black birch, Cherry birch, spice birch, river birch, mahogany birch, mountain-mahogany
Benefits to wildlife Food: Ruffed grouse feed on buds and seeds, deer and rabbits browse the twigs. The birch tubemaker, birch skeletonizer, oriental moth, gypsy moth, and dusky birch sawfly eat the leaves.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
UConn Database (w/pics)
Information from Purdue
Fact Sheet
River Birch (images)

Betula nigra
Other Common Names Red birch, Black birch, Water birch
Benefits to wildlife Food: A number of species of birds eat river birch seeds including ruffed grouse and wild turkey. White-tailed deer browse river birch.
Habitat: The bottomland hardwoods in which river birch occurs are prime wildlife habitat, providing nesting sites for waterfowl, and food and cover for many animals.
Other Links NSDA Forest Service
Univ. Conn. Database
FEIS Database
Description
Ohio Univ. Description
Care Instructions

Oak Trees
Drawings of different oak leaves
Images of oak leaves
Help to identify this oak

White Oak (images)
Quercus alba
Other Common Names Fork-leaf white oak, Ridge white oak, Stave oak, American oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Numerous birds and mammals use oak acorns as food; among them are squirrels, blue jays, crows, red-headed woodpeckers, deer, black bear, turkey, quail, mice, chipmunks, ducks, and raccoons. White oak twigs and foliage are browsed by deer.
Habitat:
Other Links Description
Univ. Conn. Database
Some historical accounts
www.albion.edu
bluehen.ags.udel.edu
Fact sheet with images
Scarlet Oak (images)

Quercus coccinea Muenchh.
Other Common Names Black oak, Spanish oak, Spotted oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Acorns are eaten by eastern gray squirrels, chipmunks, mice, wild turkey, deer, black bear, and birds, especially blue jays and red-headed woodpeckers.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with photos
Univ. Conn. Database
FEIS Database
www.discoverlife.org
Durand Oak (pics)

Quercus durandii

How the Durand oak got it's name. (very interesting)
Other Common Names Bluff oak, Durand white oak, White oak, Basket oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds (acorns) are eaten by many birds and animals such as squirrels, blue jays, crows, red-headed woodpeckers, deer, black bear, turkey, quail, mice, chipmunks, ducks, and raccoons.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Database
Southern Red Oak (photos)

Quercus falcata
Other Common Names Red oak, Spanish oak, Water oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by waterfowl, wild turkey, blue jay, red-headed and red-bellied woodpeckers, white-breasted nuthatch, common grackle, raccoon, white-tailed deer, and squirrels. Red oak acorns do not germinate soon after falling to the ground like the white oak acorns, and thus are the ideal winter food for wildlife. Red oak acorns are second in preference for fox squirrels.
Habitat: The red oak provides cover and nesting sites for birds and mammals.
Other Links Fact sheet with photos
Description
FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with photos
Cherrybark Oak (image)

Quercus falcata var. pagodaefolia
Other Common Names Bottomland red oak, Elliot oak, Red oak, Swamp oak, Swamp Spanish oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by squirrels, chipmunks and other small rodents. Deer and rabbits may eat seedlings.
Habitat:
Other Links Description
Description with images
Description with images
Description and many other details
Turkey Oak (pics)

Quercus laevis Walt.
Other Common Names Scrub oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by birds and mammals such as the black bear, white-tailed deer, fox squirrel, scrub jay, northern bobwhite, and wild turkey.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact sheet with images
FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Laurel Oak (images)

Quercus laurifolia Michx.
Other Common Names Darlington oak, Laurel-leaved oak, Water oak, Swamp laurel oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The consistent and abundant acorn crops are an important food source for many animals, including white-tailed deer, raccoon, squirrels, wild turkey, ducks, quail, smaller birds, and rodents. Laurel oak ranked second in quantity and frequency of acorns consumed by wild turkey in Florida. In a study of the 10 most heavily used winter foods of deer in Florida, laurel oak acorns rated fifth, sixth, and seventh in a 6-year period. Deer also browse on the seedlings. Acorns of the black oak group do not germinate until spring, unlike those of the white oak group, and are an important winter food source.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
A photo
Fact sheet with photos
Quick facts
More info
Champion Trees
FEIS Database
Overcup Oak (images)

Quercus lyrata Walt.
Other Common Names Swamp post oak, Swamp white oak, Water white oak, White oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Ducks, wild turkeys, squirrels, and white-tailed deer eat overcup oak acorns. The large size of overcup oak acorns renders them less suitable for duck food than other acorns.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact sheet with photos
Info from Auburn Univ. with photos
Bur Oak (images)

Quercus macrocarpa Michx.
Other Common Names Blue oak, Mossycup oak, Mossy-over-cup oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Bur oak foliage is a common and important constituent of cattle diets and for white-tailed and mule deer in the Black Hills, South Dakota. Cattle, horses, and sheep eat the seedlings. Many birds and mammals eat bur oak acorns including squirrels, deer, wood ducks, blue jays, and cows. Rodents and blue jays frequently cache the acorns for later use, thereby facilitating seed dispersal.
Habitat: Bur oak provides hiding cover and nesting sites for many birds and mammals. Red-tailed hawks, screech owls, fox squirrels, and flying squirrels nest in large bur oaks.
Other Links bluehen.ags.udel.edu
Univ. Conn. Description
Scanning Electron images of pollen
USDA Forest Service
Fact sheet with photos
FEIS Database
Blackjack Oak (images)

Quercus marilandica Muenchh.

A very small and slow-growing oak tree.

Other Common Names Barren oak, Black oak, Jack oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: As with any oak, the acorns are eaten by small mammals and birds.
Habitat:
Other Links Oklahoma Biosurvey
USDA Database
Fact Sheet with photos
FEIS Database
Swamp Chestnut Oak (images)

Quercus michauxii Nutt.
Other Common Names Basket oak, Cow oak, White oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Many small mammals and birds eat the acorns including squirrels, white-tailed deer, black bear, red fox, wild turkey, northern bobwhite, waterfowl, and chickens. Cows are fond of the acorns, however, if eaten in large quantities, tannins in the acorns can poison livestock.
Habitat:
Other Links Auburn Univ. Description
USDA Forest Service
Oklahoma Description
FEIS Database
Chinkapin Oak (drawing)

Quercus muhlenbergii Engelm.
Other Common Names Chestnut oak, Rock chestnut oak, Rock oak, Yellow chestnut oak, Yellow oak, Pin oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Chinkapin oak acorns are sweet and palatable and are eaten by squirrels, mice, voles, chipmunks, deer, turkey, and other birds.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Database
Chinkapin Oak in Florida
Description
Water Oak (images)

Quercus nigra L.
Other Common Names Possum oak, Duck oak, Pin oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Water oak acorns are eaten by many animals including squirrels, chipmunks, waterfowl, blue jay, wild turkey, and northern bobwhite. Blue jays and squirrels cache acorns in the fall and return to eat them in the winter. Deer browse water oak.
Habitat: The red-bellied woodpecker, great crested flycatcher, and hairy woodpecker nest in cavities of the water oak trees. Water oak within a pine forest provides habitat for the southern flying squirrel.
Other Links USDA Database
FEIS Database
Fact sheet with photos
Willow Oak (images)

Quercus phellos L
KWER-kus-FEL-os
Other Common Names Peach oak, Pin oak, Swamp willow oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are a food source for waterfowl, wild turkey, blue jays, red-headed and red-bellied woodpeckers, flickers, grackles, white-tailed deer, fox and gray squirrels, and other small rodents. Willow oak is considered good browse for white-tailed deer.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
More photos
Photo Slides
Chestnut Oak (pics)

Quercus prinus Engelm
Other Common Names Rock oak, Rock chestnut oak, White oak, Basket oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by white-tailed deer, squirrels, chipmunks, mice, and wild turkeys. White-tailed deer occasionally browse young oak sprouts.
Habitat: Small birds and mammals, as well as insects such as bees, use chestnut oak cavities for nesting.
Other Links Fact sheet with photos
Photo of leaves
FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Northern Red Oak (images)

Quercus rubra
KWER-kus RU-bra
Other Common Names Gray oak, Eastern red oak, Red oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The white-footed mouse, eastern chipmunk, fox squirrel, gray squirrel, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, flying squirrels, and deer mice consume northern red oak acorns. Birds that eat the acorns are the bobwhite, red-headed woodpecker, red-bellied woodpecker, blue jay, tufted titmouse, grackle, white-breasted nuthatch, sapsuckers, quail, ruffed grouse, turkey ruffed grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, wild turkey, eastern crow, northern flicker, grackle, blue jay, brown thrasher, tufted titmouse, starling, lesser prairie chicken, chickadees, nuthatches, and other songbirds. Acorns are also important food sources for various waterfowl such as the golden-eye, gadwall, wood duck, hooded merganser, mallard, American pintail, black duck, redhead, and green-winged teal.
Habitat: Many cavity nesters, such as the red-bellied and hairy woodpecker, utilize northern red oak.
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Leaf images
Fact sheet with photos
Shumard Oak (pics)

Quercus shumardii
Other Common Names  
Benefits to wildlife Food: Shumark acorns are eaten by songbirds, wild turkeys, waterfowl, white-tailed deer, and various species of squirrels.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
UAH Description
Fact sheet with images
Post Oak (images)

Quercus stellata
Other Common Names Iron oak, Box white oak, White oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by wild turkey, white-tailed deer, squirrels, and many other rodents. The tannin in leaves, buds, and acorns is toxic to sheep, cattle, and goats.
Habitat: Leaves are used for nest building by birds, squirrels, and raccoons. Cavities provide nests and dens for various birds and mammals.
Other Links Fact sheet with photos
USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
Black Oak (images)

Quercus velutina
Other Common Names Smooth-bark oak, Yellow oak, Quercitron oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: The acorns are eaten by squirrels, white-tail deer, mice, voles, turkeys, and other birds. In Illinois, fox squirrels have been observed feeding on black oak catkins.
Habitat:
Cavities in black oak trees is used for nesting by wildlife.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with photos
FEIS Database
Live Oak (images)

Quercus virginiana Mill.
Other Common Names Virginia live oak
Benefits to wildlife Food: Acorns are an important food source for many birds and mammals, including northern bobwhite, Florida scrub jay, mallard, sapsuckers, wild turkey, black bear, squirrels, and white-tailed deer.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with photos
FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service

Elm Trees

Winged Elm (images)

Ulmus alata Michx.

More links

Other Common Names Cork elm, Witch elm, Water elm, Southern elm
Benefits to wildlife Food: The mast from winged elm is eaten by birds and animals, and the twigs and leaves are important for white-tailed deer. Both twigs and leaves are most succulent, nutritious, and digestible during spring and are less useful as food the rest of the year.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with photos
USDA Forest Service
Auburn Univ. data with photos
UF Horticulture Department Fact Sheet (pdf)
American Elm (pics)

Ulmus americana L.
Other Common Names White elm, Gray elm
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by a number of small birds. The flowerbud, flower, and fruit are eaten by mice, squirrels, oppossum, ruffed grouse, northern bobwhite, and Hungarian partridge.
Habitat:
Other Links Univ. Conn. Plant Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with photos
FEIS Database
Slippery Elm (images)

Ulmus rubra Muhl.
Other Common Names Red elm, Gray elm, Soft elm, Moose elm
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by birds and small animals. Deer and rabbits browse the twigs.
Habitat:
Other Links Medicinal use and how to grow
Fact Sheet with photos
FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
September Elm (images)

Ulmus serotina Sarg.
Other Common Names Red elm
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds of September and other elms are eaten by a variety of birds and small mammals, including squirrels. Twigs and buds are sometimes browsed by deer, and a few game birds eat the buds.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Short Description
Oklahoma Description
North American Tree Guide description

Magnolia Trees

Fraser Magnolia (images N/A)
Magnolia fraseri Walt.
Other Common Names Mountain magnolia, Ear-leaf cucumber tree, Long-leaved cucumber tree
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat: Wildlife use larger defective trees of Fraser magnolia as den trees.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet
Southern Magnolia (flower flower bud stipule)

Magnolia grandiflora L.
Other Common Names Bull-bay, Evergreen magnolia, Magnolia, Larel-leaved magnolia
Benefits to wildlife Food: Southern magnolia seeds are eaten by squirrels, opossum, quail, and the wild turkey.
Habitat: Southern magnolia provides cover for many small birds and mammals.
Other Links UCONN Description
Awesome video of flower
Photos showing the flower's evolution
Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville description
FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with photos
Auburn Univ. description
USDA Forest Service
Bigleaf Magnolia (images)

Magnolia macrophylia Michx.
Other Common Names Large-leaf magnolia, Great-leaved cucumber tree, Great-leaved magnolia, Large-leaved umbrella tree, Cucumber-tree, Cowcumber tree
Benefits to wildlife Food: Some small aminals and birds may eat the seeds.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact sheet with images

Maple Trees

Red Maple (images)

Acer rubrum L.
Other Common Names Swamp maple, Soft maple, Water maple, White maple
Benefits to wildlife Food: White-tailed deer, moose, elk, and snowshoe hare browse on the trees. Small birds eat the winged seeds off the trees.
Habitat: The screech owl, pileated woodpecker, and common flicker nest in cavities in many species of maple. Also, wood ducks use cavities in the river floodplain communities.
Other Links FEIS Database
University of Conn.
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with photos
Silver Maple (images)

Acer saccharium L.
Other Common Names Soft maple, River maple, White maple, Silverleaf maple
Benefits to wildlife Food: Many birds and small mammals eat the seeds for food.
Habitat: Provides nesting for birds, especially robins.
Other Links Planting and care
More photos
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Sugar Maple (pics)

Acer saccharum Marsh.
Other Common Names Hard maple, Rock maple, Sugar-tree, Sweet maple, Sugar maple
Benefits to wildlife Food: Browsed by white-tailed deer, moose, and snowshoe hare. The red squirrel, gray squirrel, and flying squirrels feed on the seeds, buds, twigs, and leaves. The porcupine consumes the bark and can.
Habitat:
Numerous species of songbirds nest in sugar maple. Cavity nesters such as the black-capped chickadee excavate nest cavities or utilize preexisting cavities. The common flicker, pileated woodpecker, and screech owl also nest in maples.
Other Links FEIS Database
University of Conn.
Fact sheet with photos
USDA Forest Service

Ash Trees

White Ash (images)

Fraxinus americana L.
Other Common Names Biltmore ash, Biltmore white ash, Smallseed white ash
Benefits to wildlife Food: The winged seeds are eaten by wood duck, bob white, purple finch, pine grosbeak, and fox squirrel. Rabbits, beaver, and porcupine occasionally use the bark of young trees for food.
Habitat: Red-headed, red-bellied, and pileated woodpeckers will nest in cavities, after which wood ducks, owls, nuthatches, and gray squirrels will use these abandoned cavities.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
Medicinal Uses
Fact Sheet with images
Floridata
Silvics of North America
Carolina Ash (pics)

Fraxinus caroliniana Mill.
Other Common Names Florida ash, Pop ash, Swamp ash, Water ash
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
Apparently not much info on the web
Green Ash (images)

Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.
Other Common Names Darlington ash, White ash, Swamp ash, Water ash, Red ash
Benefits to wildlife Food: Deer browse the trees. The seeds are eaten by many birds and animals.
Habitat: Stands of Green Ash trees provide valuable habitat for deer, sharptail grouse, squirrels, coyotes, rabbits, racoons and porcupines and several species of small mammals.
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
University of Delaware
Blue Ash (images)

Fraxinus quadrangulata Michx.
Other Common Names Mountain ash, White ash
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
Description of
University of Conn.

Miscellaneous Nut Trees

Pecan (images)

Carya illinoenisis
Other Common Names Pecan nut, Pecanier, Pecan-tree
Benefits to wildlife Food: Pecan nuts are eaten by a number of birds, fox and gray squirrels, opossums, raccoons, and peccaries. White-tailed deer sometimes heavily browse older pecan trees.
Habitat: Pecan provides cover for a variety of birds and mammals in the oak-hickory forests.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
FEIS Database
Fact Sheet
Butternut (images)

Juglans cinerea
Other Common Names White walnut, Oilnut, Walnut, American white walnut
Benefits to wildlife Food: Squirrels and other rodents eat the nuts. White-tailed deer will eat the butternut leaves.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Black Walnut (images)

Juglans nigra
Other Common Names Eastern black walnut, American walnut, Gunwood
Benefits to wildlife Food: The nuts are food for many rodents, incuding squirrels and also for many birds.
Habitat: The eastern screech-owl roosts on the limbs of black walnut.
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Lots of other information
American Chestnut
(Images:
leaves)

Castanea dentata
Other Common Names Chestnut
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
School of Natural Resources
More
Ohio Buckeye (images)

Aesculus glabra
Other Common Names Buckeye, Fetid buckeye, Stinking buckeye, American horse chestnut
Benefits to wildlife Food: Although the buckeye nuts are considered poisonous, especially to livestock, squirrels do occasionally eat them.
Habitat:
Other Links University of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Yellow Buckeye (images)

Aesculus octandra
Other Common Names Buckeye, Sweet buckeye, Large buckeye
Benefits to wildlife Food: The fruits are poisonous to animals, thus provides no food. However, squirrels may on occasion eat the nuts.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images

Miscellaneous Berry/Fruit Trees

Sugarberry (images)

Celtis laevigata
Other Common Names Sugar hackberry, Hackberry, Texas sugarberry
Benefits to wildlife Food: The berries are eaten by many birds, including the ring-necked pheasant, waterfowl, quail, ruffed grouse, turkey and other animals. Squirrels also eat the fruit and to a lesser extend, the tree bark and buds.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Characteristics - NC State Univ.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Hackberry (images)

Celtis occidentalis
Other Common Names Common hackberry, Sugarberry, Bastard-elm, Hagberry or Nettletree
Benefits to wildlife Food: A valuable source of food for over 25 species of birds feed on hackberries, including: wild turkey, ring-necked pheasant, quail, prairie sharp-tailed grouse, lesser prairie chicken, cedar waxwing, yellow-bellied sapsucker, mockingbird, robin, flickers, cardinal, bobwhite and others. The fox squirrel will feed on both the fruit and the nipple galls. Food plant for Sphinx drupiferarum
Habitat: Provides valuable habitat for wildlife.
Other Links FEIS Database
Description
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Red Mulberry (images)

Morus rubra
Other Common Names Mulberry, Black mulberry
Benefits to wildlife Food: Many birds including wood ducks, bluebirds, indigo buntings, gray catbirds, eastern kingbirds, towhees, orchard orioles, brown thrashers, summer tanagers, vireos, red-cockaded woodpeckers, red-bellied woodpeckers, great crested flycatchers, and Lewis' woodpeckers eat the fruit. Also animals such as opossums, raccoons, fox squirrels, and gray squirrels eat the fruit. Deer browse the foilage. Beavers eat the bark.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
Downy Serviceberry (images)

Amelanchier arborea
Other Common Names Shadbush, Juneberry, Shadblow, Sarviceberry, Sarvistree, Mespilus, Grape pear, Swamp sugar pear, Bloody choke-berry.
Benefits to wildlife Food: At least 40 bird species and several dozen mammal species eat the fruit of the Serviceberry. Mammals that use downy serviceberry include squirrels, chipmunks, mice, voles, foxes, black bears, and elk Host for the Red-spotted Purple butterfly larva.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Univ. of Conn.
Black Cherry (images)

Prunus serotina
Other Common Names Wild cherry, Wild black cherry, Rum cherry, Cherry
Benefits to wildlife Food: Black cherry leaves, twigs, bark, and seeds are poisonous to livestock, however, white-tailed deer eat it with no apparent harm. Numerous songbirds feed on black cherries as they migrate south in the fall. Passerine birds that eat black cherry fruits include the American robin, brown thrasher, mockingbird, eastern bluebird, European starling, gray catbird, blue jay, willow flycatcher, northern cardinal, common crow, and waxwings, thrushes, woodpeckers, grackles, grosbeaks, sparrows, and vireos. Black cherries are also important in the summer and fall diets of the ruffed grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, wild turkey, northern bobwhite, greater and lesser prairie chicken, red fox, raccoon, opossum, squirrels, rabbits and a favorite food of black bears
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Common Persimmon (images)

Diospyros virginiana
Other Common Names Persimmon, Eastern persimmon, Date plum, Simmon
Benefits to wildlife Food: The fruit is an important food for squirrel, fox, coyote, racoon, opossum, and quail. White-tail deer, song birds, and hogs will also eat the fruit.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
Univ. of Conn.

Other Miscellaneous Trees

Honey Locust (images)

Gleditsia triacanthos
Other Common Names Three-thorned acacia, Thorntree, Honeyshucks, Locust
Benefits to wildlife Food: Honey-locust pods are eaten by white-tailed deer, Virginia opossum, eastern gray squirrel, fox squirrel, rabbits, quail (including northern bobwhite), crows, and starling. The bark is eaten by white-tailed deer and rabbits. Honey-locust is also a source of pollen and nectar for honey.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Features
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
Information with images
Black Locust (images)

Robinia pseudacacia
Other Common Names Yellow locust, Locust, White locust, Acacia
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are a limited food source for Northern bobwhite, other game birds, and squirrels.
Habitat: Heart rot in older trees provide nesting cavities for the downy and hairy woodpeckers and for the common flicker.
Other Links Ohio Trees Bulletin
Species Survey
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Wildland Invasive Species Program
American Sycamore (images)

Platanus occidentalis
Other Common Names American planetree, Buttonball-tree, Buttonwood, Planetree
Benefits to wildlife Food: Sycamore seeds are eaten by some birds including the purple finch, goldfinch, chickadees, and dark-eyed junco, and by muskrat, beaver, and squirrels.
Habitat: Hollowed sycamore trees provide homes for cavity nesting birds including the barred owl, eastern screech-owl, great crested flycatcher, and chimney swift. Wood duck use sycamores as nest trees.
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
Yellow Popular (pics)

Liriodendron tulipifera
Other Common Names Tuliptree, Poplar, Tulip-Poplar, White-Poplar, Whitewood
Benefits to wildlife Food: The flowers provide nectar for Ruby-throated hummingbirds and honey bees. Yellow-bellied sapsuckers use the phloem. The sumeracs are eaten by northern bobwhites, purple finches, cottontails, red squirrels, gray squirrels, and white-footed mice. White-tailed deer browse on the trees.
Habitat: Yellow-poplars in various stages of growth provide hiding and thermal cover for white-tailed deer, small mammals, upland game birds, waterfowl, and nongame birds. They provide habitat for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker.
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
American Beech (images)

Fagus grandifolia
Other Common Names Beech
Benefits to wildlife Food: Beech mast is eaten by a variety of birds and mammals, including mice, squirrels, chipmunks, blackbear, deer, foxes, ruffed grouse, ducks, and bluejays.
Habitat: American beech provides cover for the Carolina chickadee and the black-capped chickadee.
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Flowering Dogwood (images)

Cornus florida
Other Common Names Dogwood, Boxwood, Flowering cornel, Arrow-wood
Benefits to wildlife Food: Dogwood seeds (fruit) are eaten by at least 36 species of birds, including ruffed grouse, bob-white quail, and wild turkey. Chipmunks, foxes, skunks, rabbits, deer, beaver, black bears, and squirrels also eat the fruit.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Herbal Uses
Auburn pics
FEIS Database
Blackgum (images)

Nyssa sylvatica
Other Common Names Pepperidge, Sour-gum, Tupelo, Black Tupelo, Tupelo-gum
Benefits to wildlife Food: The fruit is eaten by many birds including the Ruffed Grouse and Wild Turkey, and animals. Young seedlings are browsed by white-tailed deer.
Habitat: Valuable as den trees and honey trees.
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Sweetgum (images)

Liquidambar styraciflua
Other Common Names American sweetgum, Liquidambar, Redgum, Delta red gum
Benefits to wildlife Food: The seeds are eaten by birds, squirrels, and chipmunks. It is also food for the Yellow-bellied sapsucker.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Sassafrass (pics)

Sassafras albidum
Other Common Names Common sassafras, Saxifrax
Benefits to wildlife Food: Sassafras leaf browsers include white-tailed deer, woodchucks, marsh rabbits, and black bears. Sassafras fruits are eaten by many species of birds including northern bobwhites, eastern kingbirds, great crested flycatchers, phoebes, wild turkeys, catbirds, flickers, pileated woodpeckers, downy woodpeckers, thrushes, vireos, and mockingbirds. Some small mammals also consume sassafras fruits. Sassafras is the host plant for the spicebush swallowtail butterfly.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Fruit (awesome pic)
USDA Forest Service
Witch Hazel (images)

Hamamelis virginiana
Other Common Names Southern witch-hazel
Benefits to wildlife Food: Witchhazel has low wildlife value except for squirrels may eat the seeds. It does have high medicinal value.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
Iowa State Biology Dept info with images
Boxelder (images)

Acer negundo
Other Common Names Ash-leaved maple, Negundo maple, Three-leaved maple
Benefits to wildlife Food: Many species of birds and squirrels feed on the seeds of boxelder. Seeds remain available throughout the winter.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Univ. of Auburn, AL
White Basswood (pics)

Tilia heterophylla
Other Common Names Beetree linden, Linn, White linn
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat: Old basswood trees tend to be hollow providing den and nesting for birds and animals.
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Drawing of leaves, twig and fruit
Some images
Sourwood (pics)

Oxydendrum arboreum
Other Common Names Sorrel-tree, Sour gum, Lily of the valley tree
Benefits to wildlife Food: White-tail deer browse the sprouts and twigs.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Description with some images
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Auburn with images
Univ. of Conn.
Image Profile
Sweetbay (pics)

Magnolia virginiana
Other Common Names Sweetbay magnolia, Swampbay, Laurel magnolia, Swamp magnolia
Benefits to wildlife Food: Sweetbay is an important forage for deer. Gray squirrels eat the fruit and to a lesser extend, white-footed mice, wild turkey, quail, and song birds.
Habitat: Sweetbay provides perching and nesting sites for several species of birds.
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Auburn images
Redbay (image of leaves)

Persea borbonia
Other Common Names Redbay persea, Swampbay persea, Swampbay
Benefits to wildlife Food: Rebbay fruit (seeds) are eaten by wild turkey, white-tailed deer, bears, northern bobwhite and many songbirds. White-tailed deer and black bears also browse the leaves.
Habitat: Provides habitat for gray squirrels.
Other Links FEIS Database
Univ. of Auburn
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Loblolly-Bay (images)

Gordonia lasianthus
Other Common Names Tan bay, Black laurel
Benefits to wildlife Food: White-tailed deer heavily browse the stump sprouts of loblolly-bay. Provides pollen for bees, flies, thrips, and hummingbirds.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
American Holly (images)

Ilex opaca
Other Common Names Holly, White holly
Benefits to wildlife Food: At least 18 species of birds, including songbirds, mourning doves, wild turkeys, and northern bobwhite, are known to eat the fruit as well as deer, squirrels, and other small animals.
Habitat: Cavities in American holly provide nesting habitat for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker.
Other Links FEIS Database
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Eastern Redbud (images)

Cercis canadensis
Other Common Names Judas-tree
Benefits to wildlife Food: Eastern redbud seeds or pods are eaten by deer, squirrels, quail, pheasants, goldfinch, cardinals, rose-breasted grosbeaks and other birds. It is critical food for the endangered golden-cheeked warblers. The flowers provide nectar for honey bees.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
More images
American Hornbean (pics)

Carpinus caroliniana
Other Common Names Bluebeech, Water beech, Ironwood, Hornbean
Benefits to wildlife Food: Ruffed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and northern bobwhite eat small quantities of the seeds, buds, and catkins. The seeds are eaten by the yellow-rumped warbler and sometimes by ducks. Seeds, bark, and wood are eaten by rabbits, beaver, fox squirrel, and eastern gray squirrel. White-tailed deer browse the twigs and foliage.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
Description with a few images
Some images
Eastern Hophornbeam (images)

Ostrya virginiana
Other Common Names American hophornbeam, Hornbeam, Ironwood (falsely referred as?)
Benefits to wildlife Food: Buds and catkins of eastern hophornbeam are important winter food for ruffed grouse. The nuts are a preferred food for sharp-tailed grouse and wild turkey and to a lesser extend for ruffed grouse, northern bobwhite, red and gray squirrels, cottontails, ring-necked pheasant, purple finch, rosebreasted grosbeak, and downy woodpecker.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Water Tupelo (pics)

Nyssa aquatica
Other Common Names Cotton-gum, Sour-gum, Tupelo, Swamp tupelo, Tupelo-gum
Benefits to wildlife Food: The fruit is eaten by wood ducks, several other kinds of birds, and by squirrels, raccoons, and deer. The foliage, twigs, and stump sprouts are eaten by deer.
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images
USDA Forest Service
Swamp Tupelo (pics)

Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora
Other Common Names Blackgum, Swamp blackgum
Benefits to wildlife Food: The fruit is eaten by birds and small mammals. The flowers are a source of nectar for bees.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
Description
Osage Orange (leaves, fruit, bark)

Maclura pomifera

Photos by: James Manhart
(fruit - immature) - (whole plant) - (branch) - (fruit - mature) - mature multiple fruits beneath parent tree

Other Common Names Bodar, Boi-d'arc, Bowwood, Hedge, Mockorange
Benefits to wildlife Food: Some animals including squirrel, fox, red crossbill, and northern bobwhite occasionally eat the seeds. Downy woodpeckers use osage-orange as forage sites.
Habitat: Small mammals and birds use the thorny tree for cover.
Other Links FEIS Database
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
Cucumbertree (pics)

Magnolia acuminata

Other Common Names Cucumbertree magnolia, Cucumber magnolia, Mountain magnolia, cowcomber
Benefits to wildlife Food: Grackles and blackbirds and several other birds and animals eat the young fruit to a small degree.
Habitat:
Other Links USDA Forest Service
Fact Sheet with images
Images of Magnolia
Allegheny Chinkapin (pics)

Castanea pumila

Other Common Names Chinkapin, chinquapin
Benefits to wildlife Food: The chinkapin nuts are consumed by squirrels, chipmunks, opossums, white-tailed deer, bluejays, pileated woodpeckers, red-headed woodpeckers, and many other birds. Deer browse the foilage.
Habitat:
Other Links FEIS Database
Fact Sheet with images
American Smoke-Tree (leaves)

Cotinus obovatus

Other Common Names Chittamwood, Smoketree, Yellow-wood
Benefits to wildlife Food: Browsed by wildlife. Fruit is eaten by many wildlife species.
Habitat:
Other Links Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
eNature
Texas Horticulture
Carolina Silverbell (images)

Halesia carolina

Other Common Names Oppossum-wood, Silverbell, Snow-drop-tree
Benefits to wildlife Food: Squirrels eat the seeds. Bees gather pollen fron the flowers.
Habitat: Squirrels nest in the trees.
Other Links Description
Images
USDA Forest Service
Univ. of Conn.
Fact Sheet with images
Southern Catalpa (images)

Catalpa bignonioides

Other Common Names Common catalpa, Indian-bean, Catawba, Cigar-tree, Catalpa
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links More images
Series of images
Univ. of Delaware
American Chestnut (pics)

Castanea dentata

Almost became extint with the onset of the chestnut blight in the early 1900's.

Other Common Names  
Benefits to wildlife Food: Deer, bear, wild turkey, grouse, squirrels, chipmunks and other animals eat the nuts (where they may exist).
Habitat:
Other Links Ohio Division of Forestry
Fact Sheet with images
Blackhaw (images)

Viburnum prunifolium

Rusty Blackhaw

Caprifoliaceae Viburnum rufidulum

Other Common Names Sloe, sloe-leaved viburnum, stagbush, shonny
Benefits to wildlife Food:
Habitat:
Other Links Fact Sheet with images

Alabama Forest Information

Hardiness Zone Map